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old fashion method

This is a discussion on old fashion method within the Breeding & Hybridization forums, part of the Orchid Propagation category; howdy everyone has anyone tried the old ancient method of germinating seeds by just sprinkling ...

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  1. #1
    Palito is offline Junior Member
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    Default old fashion method

    howdy everyone

    has anyone tried the old ancient method of germinating seeds by just sprinkling seeds in the base of the mother plants? does it work in any kind of media as long as there are roots around?

  2. #2
    Mahon's Avatar
    Mahon is offline Member
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    Palito,

    When I have TOO many orchid seed pods, I will sprinkle them on mounts or in the pots, or in conditions in which I think they will germinate naturally. Terrestrial orchid species are MUCH easier than the epiphytes and lithophytes. Otherwise, the seed pods will typically be flasked.

    The idea of sprinkling seeds around the base of the mother plant basically suggests that if the mother plant germinated from that spot, then more can germinate from there. It was a lack of understanding how orchid seeds germinate and what fungi and conditions they need in order to germinate (1800's to early 1900's). With sprinkling seeds, it's hit and miss. With flasking, it is usually more efficient in germination...

    -Pat

  3. #3
    clintdawley's Avatar
    clintdawley is offline Wrapped in metal..wrapped in ivy...
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    Default Interesting...

    I've heard it from several people that modern orchids grown in a laboratory setting have no special relationship with microrhyzza (sp?) bacteria. Therefore, sprinkling the seeds of a pod on your favorite mericlone or flask baby may not be worth it...

    Hmm..

  4. #4
    smartie2000's Avatar
    smartie2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Well with all the fungicides people use nowadays, any mycorrhizal fungi died during these treatments....

    I tried that natural method of see germination as a kid and it never worked. It was my first attempt at pollenation of two noID phals. I sprinkled my phal seed pod everywhere. It never worked probably because they were washed away during watering or it wasn't humid enough

    My first attempt at flasking wasn't sucessful yet either, I bought paph seeds. Some flasks got contaminated. I have two brachysepalum flasks left, I read somewhere that brachys are the hardest to germinate. Perhaps they weren't viable seeds or I bleached them too long...I'll be happy if I see a protocorm, but it's been months
    I'll try again with my own seeds. Probably phal, paph maudiae-type or phrag. I'll pick plants with the best form and colour so I'm not wasting time creating ugly plants...

  5. #5
    Palito is offline Junior Member
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    Default

    Interesting. I was curious so I looked around and found the answer in Plant and Soil journal. Basically a suitable fungus may be infecting the orchid roots in the pot, if there is decaying matter, dead leaves etc around to sustain it, just like in natural conditions (even if the plant is not native). seeds will probably germinate. Fungicides and other chemicals will kill the beneficial fungus.

  6. #6
    terminator is offline Member
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    Orchid seeds don't have food like other seeds. In nature, they germinate but cannot grow (starvation and die) without help from mycorrhizal fungus which provide food. However too much fungus could kill seed. The chance a seed survives in nature is less than 1 per million.

    The keywork of germination orchid seeds in vitro is contamination. If you can control the contamination then the rest will be easy. Buying a brandname commercial media (few bucks) gives you more successful chance. If you cann't, use 1.5 g/l fertilizer with micro nutrient, 20 g/l sugar, 8 g/l agar. Choose an easy growing seeds such as Phal, Den for the first time. They take only 1-2 months to become plants. Some difficult seeds can take more than 6 monts. They need a dorminant period; they depend on the season. Cheers.

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