Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42
Like Tree34Likes

Cattleya warscewiczii v. sanderiana

This is a discussion on Cattleya warscewiczii v. sanderiana within the Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Originally Posted by Halloamey I believe we will have effective virucides like we have for ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #31
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is online now Senior Member
    Real Name
    Geoff Hands
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya ?
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    England, South coast.
    Posts
    3,238
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halloamey View Post
    I believe we will have effective virucides like we have for many animal viruses or insecticides we have for many insects.
    There are plenty of virucides in existence. The disinfectant I use in my water can "kill all known vuruses, including HIV"... but it is all a matter of dosage. And the problem with virses - unlike that with fungi and insects, is that the virus lives inside the cells of the human, animal, plant or whatever host. So when you put the vurucide into the cell, it has to be something strong enough to kill the virus without killing the cell - which is so hard as to be maybe an impossibility.
    Go one step further ; the virus replicates itself by attaching to the DNA, so that when the DNA is multiplied, in cell division, there is a copy in both cells, the old and the new.
    One step more ? The virus often introduces an extra bit of code ( "stutter code" ) telling the DNA to keep reproducing the virus bit even when not multiplying the rest for cell division, so that if the cell contents are removed, e.g. by an insect sucking sap, or by a knife cutting through the cell wall, plenty of copies of the virus will be available to infect other cells which it can gain entry to..
    But make the virucide srong enough to kill the lengtrh of DNA into which it has introduced itself, and the whole of the DNA is likely killed. This is not the same thing as finding an insecticide which can be used in such a concentration so that kills the insect but not theplant - unfortunately !
    No, I am not so sanguine as to think that absoluely anything is possible, is we if we just keep working at it. And killoig viruses without t killing the host, is up there with the list of impossibles. IMHO !

  2. #32
    Halloamey's Avatar
    Halloamey is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Amey Bhide
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya alliance
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Pune, India
    Posts
    5,363
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Geoff I was not talking about the disinfectant type virucides, I am talking about systemics that will infiltrate the cell and inactivate the virus. Plants have a very very effective mechanism called ''Gene Silencing'' when the plant 'learns' through certain chemical signals that there is viral infection it is able to modifly the viral DNA or RNA in such a way that it is not replicated which is termed as ''Gene Silencing'' thus the Virus cannot replicate and cannot infect new cells. This mechanism is even more effective than the one used by animals (antibodies). Just the plants have to recognize these signals. Plants have this mechanism naturally. You will be amazed to find that wild orchids and species are rarely infected with Viruses. It is because natural selection keeps weeding out plants that do not have such effective mechanisms. But by hybridization and selection for certain aesthetic characteristics man has selected and developed plants that lack or are insufficient in some ways in these mechanisms. But if you can make the plant recognise that it has been infected most plant will be able to silence the viral genes. There is a lot of research regarding what these signals are. Various signals like heat shocks, cold treatments, certain chemicals and even certain plant and viral RNAs are the triggers that can induce this reaction.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorsetman View Post
    There are plenty of virucides in existence. The disinfectant I use in my water can "kill all known vuruses, including HIV"... And the problem with virses - unlike that with fungi and insects, is that the virus lives inside the cells of the human, animal, plant or whatever host. So when you put the vurucide into the cell, it has to be something strong enough to kill the virus without killing the cell - which is so hard as to be maybe an impossibility.
    Go one step further ; the virus replicates itself by attaching to the DNA, so that when the DNA is multiplied, in cell division, there is a copy in both cells, the old and the new.
    One step more ? The virus often introduces an extra bit of code ( "stutter code" ) telling the DNA to keep reproducing the virus bit even when not multiplying the rest for cell division, so that if the cell contents are removed, e.g. by an insect sucking sap, or by a knife cutting through the cell wall, plenty of copies of the virus will be available to infect other cells which it can gain entry to..
    But make the virucide srong enough to kill the lengtrh of DNA into which it has introduced itself, and the whole of the DNA is likely killed. This is not the same thing as finding an insecticide which can be used in such a concentration so that kills the insect but not theplant - unfortunately !
    No, I am not so sanguine as to think that absoluely anything is possible, is we if we just keep working at it. And killoig viruses without t killing the host, is up there with the list of impossibles. IMHO !

  3. #33
    cdayinflorida's Avatar
    cdayinflorida is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Cathy
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Vandaceous
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Riverview, Florida
    Posts
    5,701
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    So sad Nat

    I know there are ongoing trials with Dithiouracil and Ribavirin. To make a long story short - in the early 90's hepatitis c was Known as non-A, non-B. There wasn't a way to screen for it in blood. I had surgery and required transfusions. About 5 years later, I was diagnosed with hep C. I went on the ribavirin and interferon therapy. After a year, no copies left of the virus. Still no copies to this day.
    The use of dithiouracil and ribavirin in tissue culture is very interesting. You can google for numerous articles.

  4. #34
    Halloamey's Avatar
    Halloamey is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Amey Bhide
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya alliance
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Pune, India
    Posts
    5,363
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Yep, the only problems with Ribavirin and base analogs is that they are quite expensive at the moment atleast. Either they have to find cheaper way to manufacture them or look for new cheaper to produce compounds or target another point in the cascade.
    Quote Originally Posted by cdayinflorida View Post
    So sad Nat

    I know there are ongoing trials with Dithiouracil and Ribavirin. To make a long story short - in the early 90's hepatitis c was Known as non-A, non-B. There wasn't a way to screen for it in blood. I had surgery and required transfusions. About 5 years later, I was diagnosed with hep C. I went on the ribavirin and interferon therapy. After a year, no copies left of the virus. Still no copies to this day.
    The use of dithiouracil and ribavirin in tissue culture is very interesting. You can google for numerous articles.

  5. #35
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is online now Senior Member
    Real Name
    Geoff Hands
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya ?
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    England, South coast.
    Posts
    3,238
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Thank you Amey ; I live and learn !

  6. #36
    123orchids's Avatar
    123orchids is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Gabriela
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya, Vanda, Dendrobium
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Orlando FL
    Posts
    1,090
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Where do you get these Immunostrips?
    Last edited by 123orchids; May 15th, 2012 at 12:36 PM.

  7. #37
    Gage's Avatar
    Gage is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Gage
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Vanda garayii
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    308
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Nataliwind, so sorry that such a beautiful plant had to be tossed. Unfortunately buying from a Redland Festival vendor is far from guaranteeing against virus infection. The sad truth is that many many orchids are virus infected for years with no physical symptoms. So the only protection we have is sterile practices when repotting or making cuts (using blow torch to sterilize tools), and regular treatment against insects.

  8. #38
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is online now Senior Member
    Real Name
    Geoff Hands
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya ?
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    England, South coast.
    Posts
    3,238
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gage View Post
    sterile practices when repotting or making cuts (using blow torch to sterilize tools), and regular treatment against insects.
    Anyone not so equipped may be interested in my kit - easily obtainable from any good cooks shop - a "chef's torch" runs off butane gas - as used for making e.g. the sugary crust on creme brulee. I use cheap scissors for making the cuts - I have about a dozen pairs of these, scattered around the greenhouse, and use them once only , and then toss them in a bucket under the bench. When all used, it is the work of a few minutes to run the flame along both sides of each blade, and hang them all up again, ready for re-use. When I say "once" - I mean on one plant. I can make say a dozen cuts if needs be on one plant without re-sterilisiing ,but must re-sterilise before using on another polant even if only used once.

  9. #39
    Nataliwind's Avatar
    Nataliwind is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Bulbophyllum, Cattleya
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    New Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,247
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Thank you guys for very interesting discussion!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Dorsetman View Post
    Anyone not so equipped may be interested in my kit - easily obtainable from any good cooks shop - a "chef's torch" runs off butane gas - as used for making e.g. the sugary crust on creme brulee. I use cheap scissors for making the cuts - I have about a dozen pairs of these, scattered around the greenhouse, and use them once only , and then toss them in a bucket under the bench. When all used, it is the work of a few minutes to run the flame along both sides of each blade, and hang them all up again, ready for re-use. When I say "once" - I mean on one plant. I can make say a dozen cuts if needs be on one plant without re-sterilisiing ,but must re-sterilise before using on another plant even if only used once.
    .

    I use many different cutting instruments. I use flame and also boil cheap cutters and scissors for 30 minutes or more. May be I worry too much, but I sterilize cutters after every cut on the same plant. It makes me feel better!

  10. #40
    Nataliwind's Avatar
    Nataliwind is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Bulbophyllum, Cattleya
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    New Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,247
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 123orchids View Post
    Where do you get these Immunostrips?
    You can buy them online.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Euanthe sanderiana, aka Vanda sanderiana
    By ntgerald in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: July 21st, 2016, 03:24 AM
  2. Cattleya warscewiczii and some of my summer blooming favorites.
    By Nataliwind in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: October 18th, 2011, 08:03 AM
  3. Cycnoches-warscewiczii
    By raika in forum Orchids of Other Genera IN BLOOM
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 5th, 2009, 02:00 AM
  4. Cycnoches warscewiczii
    By zainal abidin in forum Orchids of Other Genera IN BLOOM
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: February 14th, 2009, 10:17 AM
  5. C. warscewiczii
    By Jmoney in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: June 14th, 2008, 05:28 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.