Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 15 of 54 FirstFirst ... 5131415161725 ... LastLast
Results 141 to 150 of 533
Like Tree19Likes

Floofy catts in bloom

This is a discussion on Floofy catts in bloom within the Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; He's twistinggggg her arm. It's not a strong sharp twist. It's the more subtle, sneaky ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #141
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    He's twistinggggg her arm. It's not a strong sharp twist. It's the more subtle, sneaky kind. Slowly. Nicely. While all the time whispering, "there, there - you know you want these little pretties... One more. Just one more. It can't possibly be any trouble..."

    How will she respond? Only time will tell. In a year, how many Aussie Dends might fill her collection? For that answer, dear friends, we'll just have to wait and see...

    Julie

  2. #142
    vikiikid is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Hi. Mr. Hoa,
    I've known that you're specialist in orchid especially in Cattleya. I'm now in Vietnam and have only hydrid Catts from Taiwan, VN nature orchid (Dendrobium, Paphiopedilum...). I want to learn more about Nautre, Hydrid Catts of USA, Brasil...South America.
    Thanks a lot.

  3. #143
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default Mildred exposed

    C. Mildred Rives 'Orchidglade' FCC/AOS say that three times fast - her name is as big as she is! has bloomed her other two buds. The last two came off a single sheath. The fourth sheath doesn't look like it's going to do anything, so I think this is the peak of the Mildred show. No complaints from me!!! I'm still in luv!

    Julie
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #144
    Jmoney's Avatar
    Jmoney is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    paphs, phrags, catts, vandas
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    West Hartford, CT
    Posts
    2,978
    Member's Country Flag

  5. #145
    bench72's Avatar
    bench72 is offline Moderator
    Real Name
    Tim
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Paphiopedilums
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    5,480
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jmoney
    spectacular!
    I concur!

  6. #146
    Hoa Tony Nguyen's Avatar
    Hoa Tony Nguyen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pasadena and Costa Mesa
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    Very beautiful blooms! (Knowing you, I was wondering when you would post Midred pictures again!)
    Cheers. Hoa.

  7. #147
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    Thank you, gentlemen!

    Hoa, you're such a tease! Actually, I have a confession to make. I haven't had a large catt bloom until this winter. Now I have two. I bought Mildred, and my gaskelliana is finally large enough to flower.

    Mildred was so big and beautiful and came out first. Kind of like a Marilyn Monroe of orchids. There's nothing subtle about her huge flowers, their bold coloring or their strong, but pleasant scent.

    The gaskelliana opened smaller. It's taken a few days to find its form, and in that time it seemed so dwarfed by Mildred's color and larger size (8" blooms relative to 6" blooms.) The gaskelliana is more an Audrey Hepburn.

    But looking at it today, the pale pink-lavender petals, the delicate zebra-like striping of the lip in both yellows and purples, and the richer scent, all suggest that the species might still be more spectacular than the hybrids, when one pauses and turns the loud music down.

    Julie

  8. #148
    Hoa Tony Nguyen's Avatar
    Hoa Tony Nguyen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pasadena and Costa Mesa
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    Yeah, big catts impress you, kind of like love at first sight but species charm you, sweetly and gently and that is why I like them too. Congrats on the catts blooms! Enjoy your time with them, have a tea party or something!
    Cheers. Hoa.

  9. #149
    Hoa Tony Nguyen's Avatar
    Hoa Tony Nguyen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pasadena and Costa Mesa
    Posts
    2,408

    Default Cattleya skinneri 'Danae' AM/AOS

    Revenge of the PURPLE CATTS has arrived! (Although it has started since the last posting spree!)

    Spring time is also the time of the Cattleya skinneri, sometimes also called the Easter orchid. Instead of rambling on, I leave the talking to an excellent article by AA Chadwick. Enjoy!

    Cattleya skinneri
    The Easter Orchid

    Orchids, The American Orchid Society Magazine
    April, 2003


    EASTER WOULD NOT BE EASTER without Cattleya skinneri. This delightful small-flowered Cattleya species always produces an abundance of bright rose-lavender flowers in time for this spring holiday. It is as much a part of this holiday for me as daffodils or the traditional Easter lily. Because it is so easy to grow and flower, C. skinneri is one of the most rewarding of nature’s spring-flowering orchids.

    Cattleya skinneri is native to Central America, where it thrives in wet mountain forests from just above sea level to about 4,000 feet (1,220 m). Its growing range begins in southern Mexico and extends through Guatemala and Honduras into El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. It is one of the most common orchids found in Costa Rica and is so popular there, it has been named Costa Rica’s national flower. Throughout the area, you can find plants growing in many gardens in the towns and cities, on porches and patios, fastened to trees, on tile roofs, or forming dense masses along the tops of adobe walls. Whole trunks of sabal palms can be seen covered with plants, put there by their owners to produce a colorful display for the religious holidays.

    Cattleya skinneri is usually referred to as a bifoliate Cattleya because of the two leaves that adorn the top of its pseudobulb, but, more importantly, its flowers have an entire lip — in other words, one that continues all the way around with no cuts in it as you have with Cattleya intermedia or Cattleya guttata. In this sense, C. skinneri is similar to the autumn-flowering species, Cattleya bowringiana and Cattleya deckeri. Like C. bowringiana, C. skinneri has a limited range of color forms, and most plants have rose-lavender sepals and petals with a darker lavender lip, and the lip has a white throat. There are, however, some semi-albas and albescens forms that are quite striking. The rarest and probably the most beautiful form is the true alba, which has glistening white sepals and petals and a white lip with a pale yellow throat. The true alba has no trace of lavender color anywhere in the flower.

    Cattleya skinneri produces from five to 12 flowers on a spike and usually has more than one lead even on a small plant, so the result is a marvelous display of flowers. The flowers are somewhat larger than those of C. bowringiana, normally measuring about 4 inches (10 cm) across, although some can be as large as 5 inches (12.5 cm).

    Cattleya skinneri was one of the earlier of the Cattleya species discovered, appearing in 1836 — just after Cattleya mossiae. It was described as a new species in 1837 by the English botanist James Bateman in his book The Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala (Tab XIII). Although Bateman had never been to Mexico and Guatemala, he was the world authority at the time on the orchids of these countries because of a man named George Ure Skinner, who ran a trading company in Guatemala. When Bateman was still a student at the Natural History Museum at Manchester, England, he noticed specimens of birds and insects Skinner had sent to the museum. He wrote to Skinner asking if he would send him specimens of orchids, and Skinner responded enthusiastically, sending box after box of plants he collected in the local countryside. At times, so many plants arrived that the commercial orchid company James Veitch eventually set aside a whole greenhouse exclusively for Skinner’s Central American orchids, and every private collection in Europe soon had a plant of C. skinneri.

    In his description of C. skinneri in 1837, Bateman told of his apprehension when he wrote to Skinner, a perfect stranger in a faraway country where no one really knew with any certainty that there were any orchids. Bateman described his surprise when Skinner accepted the challenge of finding and collecting Guatemalan orchids and began sending him plants. Skinner soon developed an obsession for orchids that Bateman found astonishing. “In pursuit of this object,” Bateman wrote, “there is scarcely a sacrifice which he has not made, or a danger of hardship which he has not braved. In sickness or health, amid the calls of business or the perils of war, whether detained in quarantine on the shores of the Atlantic, or shipwrecked on the rocks of the Pacific, he has never suffered an opportunity to escape him of adding to the long array of his botanical discoveries.”

    Skinner continued to seek out Central American orchids for Bateman for the rest of his life and the two developed a lifelong friendship that is one of the most famous and productive in orchid history and led Bateman to write what is often considered his best work, The Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala. Virtually all the orchids Skinner sent to Bateman were new to European horticulture and both John Lindley and James Bateman described them as new species. Because of his dedicated efforts, Skinner was honored by having his name appear on Barkeria skinneri, Lycaste skinneri and Bateman’s favorite, Cattleya skinneri. Of all the Central American discoveries, Bateman considered C. skinneri the best.

    The high esteem in which C. skinneri is held by orchid growers is demonstrated by the awards it has received over the years. Fine clones of C. skinneri have received more than 40 awards from the American Orchid Society alone. Two of the best lavender clones — ‘Heiti Jacobs’ and ‘Carpinteria’ — received First Class Certificates and there are numerous lavenders with Awards of Merit. An albescens clone, ‘Debbie’, also received an FCC/AOS because of its excellent form and large almost-white flowers. Because it produces plants with so many leads and such an abundance of flowers, C. skinneri also has a host of Cultural Commendation awards to its credit, and has been one of the most popular orchids exhibited at spring flower shows.

    In the early days of orchid hybridizing, C. skinneri was crossed with many of the other Cattleya and Laelia species, plus Brassavolas, Epidendrums and Schomburkias, but none of these crosses produced anything as famous as C. bowringiana hybrids like Cattleya Portia. The popularity of small Cattleyas today, however, continues to make C. skinneri a useful parent in modern commercial crosses.

    One of the earliest and most beautiful C. skinneri crosses and one that is still remade by commercial growers is its hybrid with another Central American Cattleya, the orange-colored Cattleya aurantiaca. The hybrid is called Cattleya Guatemalensis and it is also a naturally occuring hybrid between these two species. A fine clone of C. Guatemalensis has flowers that look like C. skinneri for size and shape, but capture some of Cattleya aurantiaca’s orange hues, giving the flowers a touch of coral, salmon or rosy-pink. The full range of color in C. Guatemalensis includes orange, purple, yellow and red, although plants with these more brilliant colors seem to exhibit more characteristics of the C. aurantiaca parent than C. skinneri with narrower petals and smaller flowers.

    Easter is a perfect time for orchids — particularly when the orchids are Cattleya skinneri. The sun is higher in the sky now and the bitter winds of winter are just a gently moving remnant of an April shower. The greenhouse has become the warm tropical climate of an Andean summer day, and C. skinneri is in flower everywhere. Cattleya skinneri is the orchid that makes spring sparkle, and it is too bad we can enjoy it only once a year.

    Cheers. Hoa.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  10. #150
    Hoa Tony Nguyen's Avatar
    Hoa Tony Nguyen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pasadena and Costa Mesa
    Posts
    2,408

    Default Lc. Casitas Spring 'Winchester' HCC/AOS

    Revenge of the purple catts continues!

    Gorgeous fragrance with this one! You can tell spring is coming when this catt blooms!
    Cheers. Hoa.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

Page 15 of 54 FirstFirst ... 5131415161725 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Floofy enough?
    By Brutal_Dreamer in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: November 18th, 2012, 08:26 AM
  2. A couple of catts in bloom
    By cindiras in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: October 29th, 2009, 12:27 AM
  3. A couple of catts in bloom
    By Diane in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: June 3rd, 2007, 09:51 PM
  4. ideas on the size and color of the bloom , and how to grow babies Catts. faster
    By rainynightstarz in forum New Growers: Ask the Senior Members
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: January 25th, 2007, 10:34 PM
  5. A Floofy for Tim
    By Gin in forum Cattleyas, Vandas, Dendrobiums IN BLOOM
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 29th, 2005, 11:06 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.