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Trying S/H?

This is a discussion on Trying S/H? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Originally Posted by Gilda Are you saying you are switching yours over to regular pots ...

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  1. #21
    Jmoney's Avatar
    Jmoney is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
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    paphs, phrags, catts, vandas
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    May 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilda
    Are you saying you are switching yours over to regular pots but still using the pellets ?? I can understand they would stay moist for a period without the wicking of water in the reservoir. I have noticed lava rock staying moist for several days. Did you test a pot full of pellets before doing this ?
    I don't know about others, but I personally use a modified s/h method for the paphs/phrags in which I use regular pots (drilling a few extra holes for air circulation) and sit them in shallow trays of water. The water serves as the reservoir and it dries up in about a week.

  2. #22
    dosal is offline Member
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    Hi Gilda,
    No I didn't try an empty pot with pellets first. I simply potted those Catts up in regular pellets in regular plastic pots, no reservoir at the bottom. The plants have adjusted nicely. The advantage I see is in not having to replace potting medium every few years and I still can't overwater or have to guess when they may need water. In other words I still water everything at the same time. I don't think I had saltbuildup from fertilizer, as a matter of fact I don't believe the 1/2 tsp/gal of fertilizer (Dynagro) at each watering was enough with all the light I get in the greenhouse, but I had mud in the bottom of the pots and still do even after repotting, rewashing, etc. With holes in the bottom I hope the mud will wash away instead of accumulating.
    Another problem I had, was roots growing like crazy bonding with all the pellets to where I had a solid mass. No air could get to those roots after this length of time in those pots and they died. Loads of roots is not always a good thing, I guess.

  3. #23
    orchid_fan's Avatar
    orchid_fan is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dosal
    This is the site where you can get the cheapest Prime Agra:

    http://cropking.com/cgi-bin/cropking...19240344526998
    Excuse my ignorance, but is LECA stone the same as PrimeAgra? Is that just another name for it? Thanks!

  4. #24
    dosal is offline Member
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    LECA stands for "Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate" and encompasses everything including Hydroton. Their product looks the same as Ray's. I have been using it for quite a while.

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