Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

How would you repot this?

This is a discussion on How would you repot this? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; I found this Miltassia Dennis Kleinback 'Crowhurst' on a bargain table tangled with lots of ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    momokev's Avatar
    momokev is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mooresville, NC
    Posts
    360

    Default How would you repot this?

    I found this Miltassia Dennis Kleinback 'Crowhurst' on a bargain table tangled with lots of others. The poor thing had no choice but to grow straight up! It does have some good roots, as well as a bloom spike. Anyone wanta throw out some ideas about what to do with it now? My thought is to cut it off at the third growth down and just pot it, hoping the new groths in the future will grow better.

    Lisa
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  2. #2
    PhalPhreak's Avatar
    PhalPhreak is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Hi Lisa,
    Wow!! That is bizarre! I think your idea about cutting it off at the 3rd growth makes sense. You could also try to mount it on a piece of driftwood or something.

    Good Luck!
    Martha

  3. #3
    Aerides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    116

    Default

    It's a lovely plant - I wonder if it was grown in a greenhouse before it came to you?

    In the best of all possible worlds, I would mount it. Miltonias tend to wander anyway. If you pot it, you might consider using a "pan" type of pot, rather than an azalea. That way, you maximize surface area, and since it's a shallower pot, you might be able to get away with partially burying the backbulb without fear of rot, to get it a little more upright.

    My two cents, and that's probably about what it's worth! Good luck though.

    John

  4. #4
    momokev's Avatar
    momokev is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mooresville, NC
    Posts
    360

    Default

    It was in a greenhouse when I bought it. I got a good price on it, and just couldn't walk away

    I had thought about mounting it, but I don't have any experience with it. Cork mount do you think? Would you put sphag moss on top of the mount? Would you still cut the rhizone, or just do the whole thing?

    Thanks guys!

    Lisa

  5. #5
    Aerides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    116

    Default

    Those pieces of natural cork are so beautiful, I think. And all those nooks and crannies would hold moisture well for the roots. I've had miltonas do the accordian thing on me and have had to keep them quite moist. That's my main reservation about mounting. But if you tie on some sphagnum around the roots that would probably help too, don't you think? My "expertise" is exhausted here. I've only ever mounted a B.nodosa and usually steer clear of miltonias until I get my GH some day. Some have the touch with them, though.

  6. #6
    momokev's Avatar
    momokev is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mooresville, NC
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Yeah, the moisture thing was my main reservation. I've never seen a milt mounted, but now that doen't mean it can't be done. And it would be pretty, I think. Do you think daily watering would be enough to offset the moisture needs? I work, so I can't give it more than that (And I grow under lights).

    Lisa

  7. #7
    Gilda is offline "Master of the Moth and Phrags "
    My Grow Area
    On a Windowsill.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    phrags
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    East TN
    Posts
    944
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Lisa, I would cut it behind the 3rd growth and pot it. I don't think you can give it enough moisture mounted(JMHO).

    It will pot ok with the other bulbs off....plus you can stick them in the pot ,too. You might get a growth off the back bulbs. You might have to place the growths in at an angle to get the new roots touching and also to keep from burying the bulbs. Take a pot clip and secure them,so they don't wobble.

  8. #8
    Ki_in_NoVa is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    101

    Default

    I don't have the best growing conditions, so I always hesistate to cut off good old growths. I would also suggest mounting, or....if you don't mind an ugly looking pot, you could try this.

    Take a tallish plastic pot and either diagonally cut the top so one side is shorter than the other, or cut a U out of one side. Pot the plant so the old pbulbs are dangling out of the shorter side, and the new pbulbs are nicely inside the pot. This assumes that the old growths don't really have good roots, and that most of the roots are on the newer pbulbs. Use a potting mix that can be sort of mounded and water carefully so it doesn't all spill out.

    Alternatively, use two pots of different heights and hope you don't have to move it much - this is good if there are lots of good roots on the old growths. Or, use a bulb pan and mound the mix (but I think it's climbing too steeply for this method).

    If all this sounds bizarre, try the mounting thing.

    I have mtssas that climb so the new growths might not be much better behaved.

  9. #9
    OrchidTraci's Avatar
    OrchidTraci is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    1,129

    Default

    Mount it to a long piece of bark? Mounting is my cure all answer to what to do when all else fails lol!

  10. #10
    Tanya's Avatar
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Loventana Lo
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Too many to mention
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    984
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I agree with Traci. Get a good size tree branch, get your hubby to attach a base to it so it can stand on its own, then "decorate" the branch with your orchids of unruly nature, and wallah, your potting problems are solved, and the dead branch seems to come back to life...lol. You can tie some sphagnum moss around the roots for moisture retention if needed. Try it... its fun...

    Tanya

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. to repot, or not to repot...
    By GrumpyBear in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: August 26th, 2008, 09:32 PM
  2. How should I repot these phrags...
    By jfrizz743 in forum Genus Specific
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 10th, 2008, 05:17 AM
  3. Repot or Not
    By Linda3406 in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: November 29th, 2007, 05:27 PM
  4. Should I repot ?????
    By Molly Taco in forum **NOT IN BLOOM** All Genera
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: April 18th, 2007, 03:15 AM
  5. To Repot or Not.....
    By mtequine in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 6th, 2006, 10:04 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.