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First Onc. and it's a (Sharry) Baby

This is a discussion on First Onc. and it's a (Sharry) Baby within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Just finished repotting this Baby. I still have a few questions though. Should I remove ...

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  1. #21
    Phyrex's Avatar
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    Just finished repotting this Baby. I still have a few questions though. Should I remove the spike since the 2.25 flowers have dried up and the spike was dried up beforehand?

    The plant seems to be growing up a little, the younger p-bulbs are higher (horizontally) than the older ones. As a result, the oldest p-bulb is potted about half way into the medium. Is this ok or should all be completely out of the medium like the biggest p-bulb?
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  2. #22
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    wetfeet101b is offline It's not dead! It's just permanently dormant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bc_bareroots View Post
    I was taught that the flowers draw a lot of the plants resources from the plant and when you repot an orchid you are separating the plant from most of it's resources. By leaving blooms on a plant that you are repotting you put the plant in jeopardy.

    It was a piece of advice I've always adhered too. Good luck, let me know how it goes. Maybe someone else will post their experience.
    If properly repotted, the plant will start to draw resources from the new pot as soon as it is time to take in nutrients.
    Most orchid culture is inert anyway, so there is no static resource pool in the old pot in the first place. Nutrients are introduced in the form of fertilizers, and unused portions are washed away when watering.
    It will be no different in the new pot - except of course, fresh media, better air circulation, and more room to grow.
    And roots are not the only means for nutrient intake. Leaves are also able to take in moisture and nutrients to a certain degree.

    If the plant is repotted in such a way that a significant portion of the healthy roots and leaves are damaged, then the plant will be stressed out - with or without flowers. The flowers did not cause the plant's decline. The grower did.

    The flowers do not draw nutrients from the plant. The plant sends it to the flowers. Big difference there in terms of who decides where the nutrients are going. The flower cannot force the plant to give it nutrients if the plant does not want to.

    Orchids are experts in resource management. It knows if the plant can no longer sustain the flowers and will discontinue the blooms if necessary. It will also evacuate all available nutrients from old tissue and divert it to the new growth to give it a better chance.

  3. #23
    wetfeet101b's Avatar
    wetfeet101b is offline It's not dead! It's just permanently dormant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phyrex View Post
    The plant seems to be growing up a little, the younger p-bulbs are higher (horizontally) than the older ones. As a result, the oldest p-bulb is potted about half way into the medium. Is this ok or should all be completely out of the medium like the biggest p-bulb?
    That is common among oncidium orchids. It is the plant's way of providing a better exposure for the new pseudobulb's roots.
    This ensures that the roots from the younger pseudobulbs will be above the older roots which are about to die or are already dead. The younger, active roots will therefore be the first to receive water and nutrients as it drops from above (rain, runoff).

    The unfortunate side effect for a potted oncidium is that it tends to "climb" out of the pot. Some species tend to have this stepladder effect more pronounced than others.

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