Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

reddish stuff on parvi+cochlopetalum paph

This is a discussion on reddish stuff on parvi+cochlopetalum paph within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Kewpie, Here is a link to another thread that had some very good advice about ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #11
    Brutal_Dreamer's Avatar
    Brutal_Dreamer is offline Dreaming with my eyes open...
    Real Name
    Bruce Brown
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleyas & Slippers
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    34,003
    Member's Country Flag
    Recipes
    15

    Default some rusty info...LOL!

    Kewpie,

    Here is a link to another thread that had some very good advice about rust. It includes some photos so you can compare what you have to the actual "Rust Demon" I hope whatever you have is taken care of soon! Anyway, here it is...

    rust deja-vue

    Cheers!
    Brutal_Dreamer

  2. #12
    kewpie's Avatar
    kewpie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    277

    Default

    thanks, bru!

    lance, the nice guy that he is, actually got in touch with the person that sold me my paph months back (why didnt i think of that?). anyway, the grower said that he accidently sprayed some plants with 5x the concentration of some kind of --cide (ill have to check my email to see what kind). he said that those concentrations cause the plants to take in more of the --cide than they need, and that causes some deterioration in the lower leaves, esp at the leaf margins. definitely explains it. for the entire summer, the paph connie truax has been sitting next to the paph malipoense that i got from the same guy, and the malipoense doesnt have any kind of orange coloration on it. ive also done a sweep of all of my other plants, and the only one that is ailing is the phal bellina that i ask yall about in a previous thread. and its not hurting from rust.

    so THANKS, EVERYONE!!! (especially lance and of course jason, for warning me not to jump!!)

    if i *did* jump, i would take all of my plants with me. :lemmetell

  3. #13
    Lance Birk is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    7

    Default Good News!!

    After further investigation, I believe it is unlikely that Kewpie's plant does have rust.

    This is great news!

    Photos on another thread about Traci's plant certainly appear to be rust, but it does not look like the insidious species which can attack Paphiopedilum orchids. That rust WILL kill Paphs. This is what I say in my new book:

    "In 1984 I imported some paphiopedilums from Thailand and when they were inspected at the plant quarantine in Los Angeles, one of the inspectors noticed a tiny rust-colored lesion on a plant of P. ‘ang thong’. Since it was so unusual, he asked to keep the plant for the pathologist to examine, and I requested a report of that necropsy. One never came and I assumed it was a false diagnosis.
    The following year in September, I returned from a trip to Peru and found that several benches of plants in my greenhouse displayed signs of severe damage. After close examination of the plants I realized they were infected with rust, and while I used several different fungicides, one or more of which seemed to have eradicated the problem, I learned later they had not actually stopped the spread of the disease.
    Rust first appears as a small, rust-colored mark or lesion on a leaf margin, or on the developing bracts of a flower stem. Usually it is so small as to be unnoticed, or to be confused with a spot of dirt, and it remains on the margin, not visibly invading the leaf structure itself. A lesion only a few millimeters long can cause the death of the plant. Even vigorous and actively growing plants can be halted in their tracks, and excising the infected parts the moment it is noticed will not guarantee it will survive.
    Plants that have been infected with the disease show signs of desiccation, severe stress and unhealthiness. They appear as if salt had been poured on them.
    The worst part is that there is no way to eradicate the disease once it is established. Rust sporolates; it produces spores which cannot be contained, and even if every plant is disposed of, the spores remain within the vicinity of the growing area to ultimately infect any new Paphiopedilum plants brought into their contact. Those spores are air-borne and could find their way outside of the greenhouse and into any newly constructed greenhouse near your property, so the possibility of salvaging your plants is not an option. Neither is the idea of removing your healthy plants to someone else’s greenhouse since they might carry the spores and spread the disease to a different area.
    After the applications of pesticides I thought I had solved the problem, but in reality, it was the cooler temperatures beginning in October, which stopped the active spread of the disease. When the warmer temperatures and higher humidity the following August and September returned, nearly half my plants became infected. The following September I lost the remainder of my collection. Soon thereafter, I was forced to tear down my greenhouse."

    I hope this will illustrate the problem.

    Loius: Thanks for your welcome. If I knew how to operate in a forum I'd respond to you individually.

    Regards,
    Lance birk

  4. #14
    Lance Birk is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    7

    Default Louis!

    I'm sorry Louis, I can't even spell your name right!

    Lance

  5. #15
    Jmoney's Avatar
    Jmoney is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    paphs, phrags, catts, vandas
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    West Hartford, CT
    Posts
    2,978
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Just goes to show you how difficult it is to accurately diagnose a plant ailment based on a description alone. It's tantamount to diagnosing a patient's ailment over the phone. A lot harder to do, unless it is an absolutely classic presentation.

  6. #16
    LJA's Avatar
    LJA
    LJA is offline OrchidTalk Tech Admin
    Real Name
    Louis J. Aszod
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Clarksville, Arkansas
    Posts
    3,778
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Lance, you can edit your messages up to 24 hrs after you post them, via the "Edit" button beneath the message you posted. (Just FYI...)

    So how do you distinguish between everyday, run of the mill rust, and Terminator rust? Any special characteristics? What chemicals control the stuff?

  7. #17
    Lance Birk is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    7

    Default More on this...

    I am not an expert on rust, but I believe that it must have much the same mode or structure that Mycorhizae utilize. That is, I think that once they invade plant tissue, they send out a 'web' of hyphae, or 'roots' as we would view them, which completely invade the tissues within the leaf, or the part of the plant in which they have entered.
    Unlike Mycorhizzae, which return sugars and mineral nutrients to the host plant, I suspect the rust invader injects a toxic substance into the host, (our orchid plants).
    In my experience, by the time I saw a lesion, the plant was probably already near death and it would only be a matter of a few days before it desiccated to point where it became obvious the plant was history.
    Some parts of the plant would still appear to be healthy, or at least not severely affected, but in fact, the plant would no longer actively grow and it would only be a matter of time....few weeks maybe, that it was obvious there was no chance that it could be revived.
    These lesions, as I viewed them, would appear along the margins of the basal leaves, usually, and collectively they would only be about half an inch long in length. Normally, an infection would fit inside an "o", and sometimes there would be a tiny "trail" of "scaring" on one or both sides of that lesion.
    I think the only treatment possible to treat rust, would be to use a systemic fungicide specifically labeled as such, and then to be prepared to set up a continuous schedule of spraying. I would suspect that spraying might be reduced in the cold, winter months when the rust is not active, or maybe just less active, but in June or July, when it gets warmer and more humid, the spraying must be religiously maintained.
    I would spray EVERY INCH of space in my greenhouse at each spraying.
    I would also rotate the types of insecticides used.
    As I said, I do not know much about rusts, but the rust that attacks Paphiopedilum orchids may not be controllable. I'm only guessing about what I would do, but then look at my experience.

    Lance Birk

  8. #18
    LJA's Avatar
    LJA
    LJA is offline OrchidTalk Tech Admin
    Real Name
    Louis J. Aszod
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Clarksville, Arkansas
    Posts
    3,778
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Experience is our best guide--some of the most successful growers I know achieve their results by intuition based on it. Much more useful, though, if it can be put into words--thanks for sharing yours!

    BTW, when's the new book due out?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Some spikes and stuff
    By mycologist in forum **NOT IN BLOOM** All Genera
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 20th, 2008, 12:39 PM
  2. Stuff from work...
    By sake of silence in forum **NOT IN BLOOM** All Genera
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: October 11th, 2006, 12:07 AM
  3. fishy stuff...
    By bench72 in forum Fish and Amphibians
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: January 14th, 2006, 03:27 AM
  4. Cochlopetalum x philippinense blooms
    By Sue in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: November 6th, 2005, 08:17 AM
  5. web-like stuff
    By kewpie in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: July 28th, 2004, 12:40 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.