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Brother Sally Taylor x sib?

This is a discussion on Brother Sally Taylor x sib? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Does anyone have a Brother Sally Taylor? I had a compot of seedlings that were ...

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  1. #1
    Liz's Avatar
    Liz
    Liz is offline Senior Member
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    Default Brother Sally Taylor x sib?

    Does anyone have a Brother Sally Taylor? I had a compot of seedlings that were marked Brother Sally Taylor x sib. One of the precocious seedlings has bloomed; it's sort of yellow background with magenta spots, darkening to solid magenta at the center of the bloom. But, all the online photos I've seen of Brother Sally Taylor are of a more solid, darker red with light edges, so I'm confused by the spots on mine. Any ideas?

    It's pretty, but I'm dying to see the other seedlings bloom, too. Kind of like my very own botany experiment in genetics...
    Liz

  2. #2
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    I don't have a brother sally taylor, but I do know that many of the crosses yielding red phals will produce yellows with varying red overlay. the pure red ones represent the few with the most coalescent overlay.

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    Liz,

    Also the different amount of red "spots" could be attributed to the temperature when the bloom developed. Warmer weather produces different patterns than cooler weather. We have noticed that several of our spotted phals bloom more solid with different temps. I first noticed this when a single plant put out two spikes around the time that the temps were changing here. The flowers look as if they belonged to two different plants. It was cool to see. Anyway, that could be what has happened to your Brother Sally Taylor x sib.


    Cheers!
    BD

  4. #4
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    "Overlay" is exactly the right word. When you look at red phal blooms under a microscope, the red pigmentation shows up as an overlay of tiny dots against a yellow or white background: the real solid color of the flower. Different clones of the same grex will manifest the red "dusting" to a greater or lesser degree, giving the blooms on each a more solid or transluscent reddish appearance. The temps under which the buds developed will also affect how many of these tiny red dots will be produced, and whether or not they're scattered uniformly. Because the flowers last so long, mature plants producing spikes at different times of the year will yield blooms that look so different from one spike to the other that it's often really hard to believe they all came from the same plant! If I remember correctly, (and I sometimes get this backwards, so if I do, forgive me...), buds developing under warmer temps will yield a more uniform and finer dusting, giving a much more solid red overlay, while those that developed under cooler conditions will have the red "haze" more coalesced into distinct "spots" to the naked eye, with more of the yellow or white background showing through between each.

    It'll be very cool to see how your others turn out!

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    That's interesting. These buds developed mostly outside, but I moved everything inside under flourescents about a month ago. Given my sunny So Cal address, I would guess this qualifies for "warmer" growing. The reddish pigment isn't dark; it's got a greyish tint to it. I think it's pretty, but I suppose this isn't what the judges are looking for...

    There was another early spiker from that compot, but I donated it in spike to a silent auction at my son's school, so I don't know what its blooms look like.

    For me, the fun is in the growing; when the blooms finally open, it's almost anti-climactic; like I'm getting jaded fast, "Oh, look, another bloom..." But, it's a little different when I don't know what the bloom will look like.

    It'll be a while until the other babies bloom; they're still pretty small. Guess I'll have to learn patience. In the meantime, maybe I'll shop for some new compots...

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    Gilda is offline "Master of the Moth and Phrags "
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liz
    I had a compot of seedlings that were marked Brother Sally Taylor x sib.
    Liz
    Liz,
    Your "orkids" ,since they are a compot of Bro. Sally Taylor crossed with sib, will be all be different to some degree. They might look like Mama, Papa, Grandma, Or Grandpa !
    Now if it were a compot of mericlones of Bro. Sally Taylor..then they would look like the online photos you referred to. Hope this explains it...enjoy seeing all your babies bloom....I like surprises !

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