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easier to grow

This is a discussion on easier to grow within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; are Phrags generally easier to grow (flower) than Paphs? What do YOU think is the ...

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  1. #1
    Cinderella is offline Senior Member
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    Default easier to grow

    are Phrags generally easier to grow (flower) than Paphs? What do YOU think is the easiest genus to grow??

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    If I may toss a related question onto your thread: are phrags as subject to crown and leaf rot as paphs are?

    Julie

  3. #3
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    I think your average phrag is much easier to grow than your average paph. Certain phrags are temperamental, and certain paphs grow like weeds, but in general phrags are much more inclined to root than paphs, which can be quite stingy with their root formation. More challenging phrags include the long-petalled *species*, such as caudatum, wallisii, etc. Long-petalled hybrids are as easy to grow as any other phrag. Most phrags require plenty of water and are quite resistant to overwatering (although it can be done). If you're a habitual underwaterer, stick with the catts and stay away from phrags; otherwise they grow exceptionally well for most people.

  4. #4
    Jmoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Piper
    If I may toss a related question onto your thread: are phrags as subject to crown and leaf rot as paphs are?

    Julie
    the long-petalled species such as caudatum and wallisii are *very* prone to basal rot during the dog days of summer. not so much the rest of the year. phrag besseae is also rot-prone, also during the hot days of summer.

    I haven't had nearly as much basal rot in paphs as I do with the long-petalled phrag species. I can't single out a group of paphs that is particularly rot-prone, except the brachypetalums.

    All the other phrags are quite rot-resistant I think, given all the standard precautions of air movement and avoiding water in the crown, etc.

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    Cinderella is offline Senior Member
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    Jason, I have Phrag Schroderae. Is that a species or a hybrid? I'm not sure. Thanks.

    Re Paphs....like you said, talk about stingy on the roots! I find it virtually impossible to "save" a bad paph and get new roots to grow.

  6. #6
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    Debbie, Schroderae is a hybrid: caudatum x Sedenii.

    Getting a root-rotted Paph to grow new roots is definitely a tricky business, and usually won't work if you just repot the plant. You need to put it in an environment where the humidity is extremely high and keep an eye out for leaf rot in the meantime. Sphag n Bag works *sometimes*, but even so, it can take years to get the plant turned around to where it's blooming again--you may as well grow up a little seedling....

    On the whole, the hybrids of both types--paphs and phrags--are definitely easier to grow and more tolerant of varying conditions than are the species.

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    If you can supply the right cultivation then both would be about about the same , except if you are on about getting a Paph roth to flower.Even with the right cultivation this can take many years.
    Phrag hybrids seem to be pretty easy to get to flower , Paph hybrids i don,t know i,m still waiting to see if the 5 i have(primary hybrids all with P. roth in them) will flower this spring.

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