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What could it be?

This is a discussion on What could it be? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; I've never heard of, let alone seen, an Oncidium without pseudobulbs. (That doesn't mean there ...

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  1. #11
    RSJ
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    I've never heard of, let alone seen, an Oncidium without pseudobulbs. (That doesn't mean there aren't any, just that I'd be mighty suprised to find one.) Those two growths might be keikis in the making.
    That was my thinking, too. But I'm in no way an expert so didn't care to argue with her too much, though she clearly isn't an expert either.

    So, back to assuming it's some kind of neo-like hybrid, then how much humidity are you keeping yours in in it's empty clay pot? I'm windowsill growing mostly, but have a couple old fishtanks that now house some mini's and need to know if i should put this baby into the tank, or will windowsill culture work? Sigh...I hate not knowing what I've got to work with here, but I did it to myself so I will just have to consider this an adventure!

    RSJ

  2. #12
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    Hey Ronnie Sue! If that is an Oncidium type, check Tolumnia, they are Oncidiums, and yes, flowers comes in white, red, yellow and some are orange, and they have no visible pbs. They are lovely little dancers. The plant is susceptible to rot and I will get that out of the sphagnum moss if I were you and put it on mount. I think Orchid Traci got one of these. The roots are wrong though, Tolumnia have very thin roots. Whatever it is, good luck with it.

  3. #13
    RSJ
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    Default Sleuthing continues

    I'm leaning toward a Sarcochilus hybrid now. My reasoning goes like this:

    Growth habit is consistent with this little one. Vanda-like fans, clumping habit (hence the two new growths I have coming up already?), compact.

    Flowers in a closed-up shape could have been due to being at the end of their bloom, rather than open as when in prime. Petals weren't fused, but held closed when I saw them.

    They are cool growing and it was from a B.C. Canada grower (we rarely see vanda, neofinetia, asco. and the like from our northern neighbors' nurseries), and they came in alongside zygopetalum hybrids.

    Whadya think? Tim, seen these around your neighborhood?

    RSJ

  4. #14
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    Forgot about Tolumnia--they grow in fans--but Tanya's right about the roots. Tolumnia roots are very thin and threadlike, nowhere near as thick as Phals.

    But I think you're onto something with Sarchochilus. Fanlike growth habit, relatively fleshy, strap-shaped leaves, and thick roots would be consistent with that genus. Which grex though---

  5. #15
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    Hi Ronnie Sue,

    Can you remember what the lip on the flower of this plant looked like? That might give an indication of what genus this falls into. If the lip is quite large and frilly compared to the rest of the flower then It is quite possible that the plant is a Tolumnia. This would be in line with the growth habit, size, clumping habit. But inconsistent with thick roots and being grown in Canada unless that person had a way to keep the plant in warm conditions.

    Will reserve judgement about the Sarc link till I know a bit more... but for the record, can't see this as a str8 out Sarcochilus.. maybe an intergeneric, ie Sarconopsis or Sarcovanda, Leanyara, Porteara, Sladeara... but I think the lip is not a very prominent feature of these flowers.

    have added pic of Sarconopsis flowers as a reference point...

    Cheers
    Tim
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  6. #16
    RSJ
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    *laughing*, hooboy, I'm sick with the orchid bug! Here I am peering intently at this tiny shriveled totally dried up flower I got off the moss it used to be in, trying to see "frilly" on the crispy little lip. If my staff could see me, they'd think the boss had gone bonkers. (My kids already know it so it would be no surprise to them. )

    All the petals, sepals, and lip are the exact same size and shape. Evenly shriveled too.

    I'm going with the sarco hybrid as more likely over the tolumnia due to the root size and how they are growing with no branching.

    Thanks to all for your suggestions and ideas. I'm thinking that either way it should be fairly safe to grow it at the cool end of intermediate and medium light to start.

    If is really is a tolumnia, it will let me know pretty darn quick that it doesn't like the cooler temps.

    Well on to other mysteries! I'll let you know as it grows, or not, if we can figure out what it is then.

    RSJ

  7. #17
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    One more wild guess RSJ, if you don't mind. I love mysteries .
    I saw this pic on the other forum and the plant is called Vanderia Newberry Jasmine. I've never seen this plant in person before and I don't know what a Vanderia is. But according to the owner, the plant is a cross between Sedirea japonica and Holcoglossum amesianum and its only over 4" tall. Does it look similar to yours?

    Here's a pic and as the name implies, it smells like jasmine (according to the owner).
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  8. #18
    RSJ
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    Hmmm. I love a good mystery too, so of course I don't mind the guessing! The foliage and leaves look like that, but the flowers were smaller in relationship to the leaves. But wouldn't it be NEAT if that was what it was? I love things that smell good! And pretty too! Maybe I'll get lucky and find out that this mystery plant IS a Vanderia. Thanks for the lead!

    RSJ

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanya
    One more wild guess RSJ, if you don't mind. I love mysteries .
    I saw this pic on the other forum and the plant is called Vanderia Newberry Jasmine. I've never seen this plant in person before and I don't know what a Vanderia is. But according to the owner, the plant is a cross between Sedirea japonica and Holcoglossum amesianum and its only over 4" tall. Does it look similar to yours?

    Here's a pic and as the name implies, it smells like jasmine (according to the owner).



    take it closer
    and have another foto...Rhrds. Dragon Charmy, Rhynchostylis gigantea x Aerides(Sedirea) japonica

    and...Neofinetia falcata x Rhynchostylis gigantea...i only know their japanese and chinese name@@
    紅雫
    花吹雪
    and the next one is..Sedirea x Neofinetia

    and the last one..Neostylis Lou Sneary(coelestis x falcata)


    those photos are not mine...
    and enjoy on those fantastic photos =D~

  10. #20
    RSJ
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    Lovely! Sadly, none of those looks like what I got. But thanks for the pix!

    RSJ

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