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View Poll Results: Do you grow Terrestrial orchids?

Voters
63. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, i LOVE them! i grow everything i can get my hands on...

    18 28.57%
  • Yes, i grow Asian terrestrials

    14 22.22%
  • Yes, i grow European terrestrials

    0 0%
  • Yes, i grow African or American terrestrials

    0 0%
  • I grow a particular genus/s only

    9 14.29%
  • No, i need encouragement!

    22 34.92%
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Do you grow Terrestrial Orchids?

This is a discussion on Do you grow Terrestrial Orchids? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Originally Posted by angela Hi Jordan Yes, but there are some that are terrestrial, in ...

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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by angela View Post
    Hi Jordan
    Yes, but there are some that are terrestrial, in particular the 2 that I mentioned.
    I know radicans is semi-i grow mine attached to palm trees in our backyard, sometimes the seeds will germinate in pots of soil. As for the E ibaguense, i cant really comment. Impressive collection of ters though Angela, I would love to see some pics of the spaths!!

  2. #32
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    Default Spath. Kimbaliana & Spath. Parsonsii

    Sorryt he photo of Kimbaliana is not of the best quality.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  3. #33
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    wow! they look like butterflies resting on the stem! very nice ill have to look for some seed

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwiorchids View Post
    Just a question-how easy is it to get european terrestrials over the ditch? It is near impossible here-case in point: For three Dacs, i spent 150NZD, and they were not even poking the surface of the soil in the pot yet....
    Itís not easy to get hold of European terrestrials in Australia. The commercial nurseries donít bother with them so you rarely see them offered for sale, although there are a couple of specialist bulb nurseries that offer the odd Dactylorhiza species. The few exotic terrestrials that I am growing have either been given to me by other terrestrial growers or grown from seed that Iíve imported. Orchid seed is generally pretty easy to import into Australia so long as itís clean and properly labeled.

  5. #35
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    Hi jordan, just for reference here is the article re. the rare cyp orchid on a golf course and the police security. I was intrigued so went searching.

    Britain's rarest flower given round-the-clock police protection

    By Cahal Milmo and Stian Alexander

    It is the sort of police operation reserved for the highest-profile VIPs. Patrols have been stepped up around the subject's place of residence and covert CCTV is being considered. The potential target has also been security tagged to protect against abduction.

    What is all the more remarkable is that this treatment, normally kept for visiting dignitaries of a foreign state or perhaps a Cabinet minister, is being rolled out for a single delicate plant on a Lancashire golf course
    What makes this specimen so precious is that it is one of the few examples of Britain's rarest flower.

    A Lady's Slipper orchid, whose name is inspired by its distinctive shoe-shaped flower, is now the subject of strict security by Lancashire Constabulary after it bloomed on the Silverdale Golf Course in Carnforth – making it the most sought-after plant in Britain for obsessive orchid fanciers.

    The plant is strictly protected by law. Even touching one requires a special licence from Natural England. Nevertheless, cuttings from a Lady's Slipper, whose Latin name is Cypripedium calceolus, are so in demand that collectors are prepared to pay up to £5,000 for a flowering example.

    Lancashire police confirmed yesterday that they had mounted an extensive operation to protect the Silverdale orchid; police tape surrounds the site and police regularly patrol the golf course on foot. Two attempts have been made in the last six years to steal or damage the plant, and it has now been security marked to ensure that anyone trying to seize a cutting can be identified.

    If senior officers deem it suitable, special CCTV cameras will also be deployed around the site in the next few days to relay footage direct to police headquarters, where the orchid can be monitored around the clock.

    PC Duncan Thomas, wildlife officer for Lancashire police, said: "We have been monitoring this amazing plant for a number of years and you can't help being impressed, not only by its rarity but by the incredible display when flowering. "Sadly, there are persons who will seek to steal it and we are working to ensure its continued success."

    The Silverdale orchid is thought to be one of less than a dozen of the flowers now growing in the wild in Britain.

    For decades, the UK population of Cypripedium calceolus, once widespread across northern England but thought to have been picked to extinction by 1917, consisted of a single plant discovered by botanists in the 1930s at a location which remains a closely guarded secret.

    Such is the importance of the plant that it has its own panel of botanical experts, the Cypripedium Committee, to discuss how to protect and propagate the species. The plant is now the subject of a programme led by scientists at Kew Gardens in London to plant Lady's Slipper orchids grown from the seed of wild plants at different locations, although numbers remain extremely low.

    As a result, the distinctive yellow and purple bloom is highly prized by illegal orchid collectors, who flock to known sites in May and June in the hope of snatching a flowering sample.

    The Silverdale orchid was severely damaged in 2004 when a thief attempted to dig up the entire plant, with its roots. A flowering stem was also cut and stolen last year.

    PC Tony Marsh, the community beat manager for Silverdalesaid: "The biggest threat is collectors. When flowers were taken last year, we think purely just to press and put in a book, the value was thousands of pounds.

    "The Lady Slipper Orchid here is an incredibly important plant. It is iconic to many people who enjoy wildlife in Britain. People travel from all ends of the country on what is almost a pilgrimage to view the plant and are often overcome with emotion at the sight."

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by opaline View Post
    Hi jordan, just for reference here is the article re. the rare cyp orchid on a golf course and the police security. I was intrigued so went searching.

    Britain's rarest flower given round-the-clock police protection

    By Cahal Milmo and Stian Alexander

    It is the sort of police operation reserved for the highest-profile VIPs. Patrols have been stepped up around the subject's place of residence and covert CCTV is being considered. The potential target has also been security tagged to protect against abduction.

    What is all the more remarkable is that this treatment, normally kept for visiting dignitaries of a foreign state or perhaps a Cabinet minister, is being rolled out for a single delicate plant on a Lancashire golf course
    What makes this specimen so precious is that it is one of the few examples of Britain's rarest flower.

    A Lady's Slipper orchid, whose name is inspired by its distinctive shoe-shaped flower, is now the subject of strict security by Lancashire Constabulary after it bloomed on the Silverdale Golf Course in Carnforth – making it the most sought-after plant in Britain for obsessive orchid fanciers.

    The plant is strictly protected by law. Even touching one requires a special licence from Natural England. Nevertheless, cuttings from a Lady's Slipper, whose Latin name is Cypripedium calceolus, are so in demand that collectors are prepared to pay up to £5,000 for a flowering example.

    Lancashire police confirmed yesterday that they had mounted an extensive operation to protect the Silverdale orchid; police tape surrounds the site and police regularly patrol the golf course on foot. Two attempts have been made in the last six years to steal or damage the plant, and it has now been security marked to ensure that anyone trying to seize a cutting can be identified.

    If senior officers deem it suitable, special CCTV cameras will also be deployed around the site in the next few days to relay footage direct to police headquarters, where the orchid can be monitored around the clock.

    PC Duncan Thomas, wildlife officer for Lancashire police, said: "We have been monitoring this amazing plant for a number of years and you can't help being impressed, not only by its rarity but by the incredible display when flowering. "Sadly, there are persons who will seek to steal it and we are working to ensure its continued success."

    The Silverdale orchid is thought to be one of less than a dozen of the flowers now growing in the wild in Britain.

    For decades, the UK population of Cypripedium calceolus, once widespread across northern England but thought to have been picked to extinction by 1917, consisted of a single plant discovered by botanists in the 1930s at a location which remains a closely guarded secret.

    Such is the importance of the plant that it has its own panel of botanical experts, the Cypripedium Committee, to discuss how to protect and propagate the species. The plant is now the subject of a programme led by scientists at Kew Gardens in London to plant Lady's Slipper orchids grown from the seed of wild plants at different locations, although numbers remain extremely low.

    As a result, the distinctive yellow and purple bloom is highly prized by illegal orchid collectors, who flock to known sites in May and June in the hope of snatching a flowering sample.

    The Silverdale orchid was severely damaged in 2004 when a thief attempted to dig up the entire plant, with its roots. A flowering stem was also cut and stolen last year.

    PC Tony Marsh, the community beat manager for Silverdalesaid: "The biggest threat is collectors. When flowers were taken last year, we think purely just to press and put in a book, the value was thousands of pounds.

    "The Lady Slipper Orchid here is an incredibly important plant. It is iconic to many people who enjoy wildlife in Britain. People travel from all ends of the country on what is almost a pilgrimage to view the plant and are often overcome with emotion at the sight."
    SEE?! I told you... That is incredible though! 5000 pounds?! times it by three, and thats NZ currency....

  7. #37
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    Pavel, I left the plants on their original pots from the store. they use a very light mix made with canadian sphagnum peat moss, composted bark, parboiled rice hulls and some other things that they don't tell you, hehe.
    When I bought the 'roots' or rhizomes (I have no idea what they are!) I used regular commercial potting soil. I thought it would be good since they are terrestrials, and as I said, my mom's bletillas were planted in a metal pot with garden soil, and they lived for long, long time with temperatures of 100į+ most of the summer, very little or no rain and 3-4 hrs of direct sun light.
    Here in Oklahoma we have lots of rain (not this year btw!) and very cold winters. I had them by an east facing wall where they had 3-4 hrs. of morning sun but when they died back I took the pots to the garage... by spring I found them dead.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Khayael View Post
    Pavel, I left the plants on their original pots from the store. they use a very light mix made with canadian sphagnum peat moss, composted bark, parboiled rice hulls and some other things that they don't tell you, hehe.
    When I bought the 'roots' or rhizomes (I have no idea what they are!) I used regular commercial potting soil. I thought it would be good since they are terrestrials, and as I said, my mom's bletillas were planted in a metal pot with garden soil, and they lived for long, long time with temperatures of 100į+ most of the summer, very little or no rain and 3-4 hrs of direct sun light.
    Here in Oklahoma we have lots of rain (not this year btw!) and very cold winters. I had them by an east facing wall where they had 3-4 hrs. of morning sun but when they died back I took the pots to the garage... by spring I found them dead.
    Were the pots free draining? Mine are mostly planted in Tufa pots (its like concrete, peat, gravel ets mixed together and formed into a pot) and the water can escape from the pot wherever it wants. Maybe they are being kept too dry? They dont like it too dry...they should be fine in your weather-if youve ever heard about the weather here....

  9. #39
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    I have tried several terrestrial orchids in the past, but so far only Bletilla striata thrives in my climate.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwiorchids View Post
    wow! they look like butterflies resting on the stem! very nice ill have to look for some seed
    im surprised you have trouble finding those...they are all over thailand, i know se asia isnt exactly close but i would have thought they would be a easy import for yall

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