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The unfortunate nature of orchids

This is a discussion on The unfortunate nature of orchids within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; The unfortunate thing about orchids is that they are sold in bloom and once finished ...

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  1. #1
    m9mike9 is offline Member
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    Default The unfortunate nature of orchids

    The unfortunate thing about orchids is that they are sold in bloom and once finished most are not given the attention necessary to keep them going.

    My grandmother has grown 2 phals successfully for some years and while I don't think she's keeping them as orderly as I would with mine, she's doing a great job. The trouble is that people consider them disposable plants and if I'm honest they do take effing ages to bloom after the spikes are gone. Maybe this makes them unsuitable for a grower who wants instant gratification. One thing I will say is that my nan has had bloom after bloom after bloom and I haven't yet had my first rebloom! But that said, I still believe my growing method will do great things in 2012.

    So without further ado, I give you my dreadfully boring plants with no flowers:



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  2. #2
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    walingwaling is offline Senior Member
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    The Phal's look healthy and fat, but i think the Dendrobium needs more light.

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    I'd say those phals need more light as well judging by the color. They do look nice and healthy though!
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    m9mike9 is offline Member
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    Thanks for the advice there! It's the Winter and the shelf is not that bright at the moment. I'll give them a holiday up in the sunny room.

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    charitygrace is offline Junior Member
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    They look pretty good to me. I kill dendrobiums in a matter of hours, so you clearly know something I don't. I completely agree on the instant gratification growers. My mother is a florist and so she brings lots of orchids home(more than I can care for). I give them away as gifts and many people become angry when the blooms eventually fall off and throw the orchid away. I guess people are very impatient these days.

  6. #6
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    I have a little trick that works with the sort of people who toss the orchids out after they bloom...just ask them why in the hell they go to all that trouble digging up their yards to plant roses only to put twice as much effort into digging them back up and tossing them out after bloom season. Seems like a waste of time, money, and effort to me...not to mention all the thorn wounds!
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  7. #7
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    Hey! If ones personality requires or is stimulated by instant gratification, then orchids are not the best choice unless you are wealthy, wasteful or own a botanical garden.
    People that consider phals as disposable plants is a big advantage for us and the main reason I have a fare few phals in my collection after I have shrieked at the moment they are to head vertically downwards into the bin or been thought of as result of an unwanted plant given to someone with greenfingers.

    In addition sometimes works in favour of the mixed communal orchid hobbyist who can snap up a bargain on the reduced section because inflorescence is past its best or finished and removed. Patience is a concept applicable to care of orchids all round and in the broadest sense whether it be ressurecting an orchid in decline or the wait for the plant to acclimatize and resume active growth. Waiting for a spike is an accepted and recognised integral part of orchid growing and the timescale waiting for rebloom is largely non applicable. Instant gratification and orchid growing will struggle to coexist unless you are wealthy and treat them as short lived table decoration or interior design focal points. This is a main goal and objective and the sign of a spike developing is an overwhelming reward and sense of achievement. I would say that spiking and blooming inflorescence is the key to the motivation of an orchid hobby. A spent plant on the reduced rack whether retaining a sample of the flower or not would not be disregarded and overlooked by most orchid hobbyists whatever the measure of purchase consideration may be.

    Phals will always be one of the main orchids for gifts, suprizes or a treat and they are such a cheap, convenient solution to a decision making gift dilemma. Forever considered disposable. Doesnt that idea just cut you deep.!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Thank god not everyone is in the orchid hobby category otherwise our thrill of a bargain spontaneous purchase would be rare.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by opaline View Post
    Hey! If ones personality requires or is stimulated by instant gratification, then orchids are not the best choice unless you are wealthy, wasteful or own a botanical garden.
    People that consider phals as disposable plants is a big advantage for us and the main reason I have a fare few phals in my collection after I have shrieked at the moment they are to head vertically downwards into the bin or been thought of as result of an unwanted plant given to someone with greenfingers.

    In addition sometimes works in favour of the mixed communal orchid hobbyist who can snap up a bargain on the reduced section because inflorescence is past its best or finished and removed. Patience is a concept applicable to care of orchids all round and in the broadest sense whether it be ressurecting an orchid in decline or the wait for the plant to acclimatize and resume active growth. Waiting for a spike is an accepted and recognised integral part of orchid growing and the timescale waiting for rebloom is largely non applicable. Instant gratification and orchid growing will struggle to coexist unless you are wealthy and treat them as short lived table decoration or interior design focal points. This is a main goal and objective and the sign of a spike developing is an overwhelming reward and sense of achievement. I would say that spiking and blooming inflorescence is the key to the motivation of an orchid hobby. A spent plant on the reduced rack whether retaining a sample of the flower or not would not be disregarded and overlooked by most orchid hobbyists whatever the measure of purchase consideration may be.

    Phals will always be one of the main orchids for gifts, suprizes or a treat and they are such a cheap, convenient solution to a decision making gift dilemma. Forever considered disposable. Doesnt that idea just cut you deep.!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Thank god not everyone is in the orchid hobby category otherwise our thrill of a bargain spontaneous purchase would be rare.
    I couldn't agree more

  9. #9
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    It just pains me to see life of any sort as disposable. OK, some humans yes, but there is the wasted gift of intellect in those 'few' cases.. I guess I am too attached to the 'lesser lives' that I am allowed to guard.
    Posted via Mobile Device

  10. #10
    orcoholic is offline Senior Member
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    Orchids get a bad rap. They grow and bloom just like all other plants. They just need to be treated properly. A garden plant that's not planted in the right spot will refuse to bloom again, just like orchids not given the right amount of light or other cultural factors it needs.

    If you think about it, orchids don't bloom any less than any other plant. All the plants in my garden bloom once a year - just like orchids. (my weeds also bloom once a year. So do food crops.) Then they go through a dormancy (winter) and then a growing process (putting on new leaves) and bloom again during their blooming season - about a year later. Most orchids don't even go through a dormancy - or at least a very long one.

    In addition, orchids bloom a lot longer than a most of the perennials in my garden and they are a lot nicer.

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