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  • 2 Post By sand_tiger86
  • 3 Post By Brutal_Dreamer

Phal. spikes - how do they not get infected?

This is a discussion on Phal. spikes - how do they not get infected? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Unlike most orchids, where the spikes emerge from the base of the plant, from the ...

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  1. #1
    sand_tiger86's Avatar
    sand_tiger86 is offline Senior Member
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    Kelly
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    Default Phal. spikes - how do they not get infected?

    Unlike most orchids, where the spikes emerge from the base of the plant, from the top of a cane or from in between leaves, Phal. spikes literally split the plant open when they emerge, leaving a gaping wound. How do they prevent themselves from getting infected from such a traumatic seeming experience? Just a random thought that crossed my mind while studying a Phal. of mine today.

  2. #2
    Brutal_Dreamer's Avatar
    Brutal_Dreamer is offline Dreaming with my eyes open...
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    Never really considered this, Kelly. Seems to me that the orchid simply evolved to protect itself naturally so that it could reproduce. The opening grows together as the spike pushes through-- much like our gums do when a new tooth grows I would guess. Maybe Amey will have an answer for you on this one. Good question!!

    cheers,
    BD

  3. #3
    Cjcorner's Avatar
    Cjcorner is offline Senior Member
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    My question is how the tiny thing rips through that tough leaf? Plants and their growth have always made me curious about how things such as the spike breaking through the leaf, work.

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