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  • 9 Post By Ron-NY

Paph. vs. Phrag.

This is a discussion on Paph. vs. Phrag. within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; What is the defining features of these versus the other? I have seen Paphs that ...

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    Anteater is offline Senior Member
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    Default Paph. vs. Phrag.

    What is the defining features of these versus the other? I have seen Paphs that look like Phrags and vice versa.

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    Ron-NY is offline rothaholic
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    Paphiopedilums - These are found in the tropical rainforests southeast Asia extending into China
    Phragmipedium, - Are located in Central and Northern South America

    There is a a huge cultural difference in their culture Phrags are cultured wetter and brighter than Paphs
    Morphologically there are differences as well.

    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...r-orchids.html

    Phrags have long, sword-shaped leaves and Paphs have thicker, wider leaves that are held closer to the ground. No Phrags have motttled leaves, some but not all Paphs do.

    The ovaries are a huge part of the classification of slippers. Paph ovaries are unilocular (one chamber), Phrag ovaries are trilocular (three chambers).

    Flower structure is similar but genetically they are different and can not interbreed.

    It takes some experience to be able to note the differences but a little experience goes a long way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron-NY View Post
    Paphiopedilums - These are found in the tropical rainforests southeast Asia extending into China
    Phragmipedium, - Are located in Central and Northern South America

    There is a a huge cultural difference in their culture Phrags are cultured wetter and brighter than Paphs
    Morphologically there are differences as well.

    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...r-orchids.html

    Phrags have long, sword-shaped leaves and Paphs have thicker, wider leaves that are held closer to the ground. No Phrags have motttled leaves, some but not all Paphs do.

    The ovaries are a huge part of the classification of slippers. Paph ovaries are unilocular (one chamber), Phrag ovaries are trilocular (three chambers).

    Flower structure is similar but genetically they are different and can not interbreed.

    It takes some experience to be able to note the differences but a little experience goes a long way.
    Thanks for the reply, Ron. I was mainly wondering how you could tell the difference between the flowers. I first thought that the pouches were the main difference, since the phrags seemed to have more swollen looking pouches, but I've seen that doesn't always hold true.

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    Ron-NY is offline rothaholic
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    There is a morphological difference in the flowers as well but it does not hold true for all. I agree for the novice it would be difficult to differentiate.
    Paph flowers are more waxy although Parvis are not waxy. Phrags are of a softer texture. Big differences are found in the staminodes. The leaves are the biggest difference. Most paphs have rimless bucket-shaped pouches while the majority of phrags have a bucket shaped pouch, but with a "lip" all around the inner rim of the pouch.

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    Well, I'll probably always remain a novice concerning those two types, since I doubt I'll end up with that many of them. I have seen a couple phrags that I would like to have. One is white with tiny purple spots on it that I think had Jerry Fischer in the name, and another was a brilliant red with a slight yellow shade in the center.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron-NY View Post
    Paphiopedilums - These are found in the tropical rainforests southeast Asia extending into China
    Phragmipedium, - Are located in Central and Northern South America

    There is a a huge cultural difference in their culture Phrags are cultured wetter and brighter than Paphs
    Morphologically there are differences as well.

    I would give you kudo points if I could,this is a great explanation,. Thanks Ron...

    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...r-orchids.html

    Phrags have long, sword-shaped leaves and Paphs have thicker, wider leaves that are held closer to the ground. No Phrags have motttled leaves, some but not all Paphs do.

    The ovaries are a huge part of the classification of slippers. Paph ovaries are unilocular (one chamber), Phrag ovaries are trilocular (three chambers).

    Flower structure is similar but genetically they are different and can not interbreed.

    It takes some experience to be able to note the differences but a little experience goes a long way.
    This explanation deserves kudo points (wish I could) Thanks for great understandable information Ron.

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