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Best orchids for NYC Apt?

This is a discussion on Best orchids for NYC Apt? within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Can anyone tell me what type(s) of orchid(s) would do best under these condiditions? 1) ...

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  1. #1
    ang709's Avatar
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    Red face Best orchids for NYC Apt?

    Can anyone tell me what type(s) of orchid(s) would do best under these condiditions?

    1) NYC apartment with all windows facing east (there are no buildings blocking the light that comes in).

    2) If it's necessary to leave a blind partially open in the morning, I would be able to open it a lunch time.

    3) There is nowhere to put an orchid outside in the summer.

    Thanks for any suggestions. I'd like to be a little bit informed before I buy another orchid, instead of just doing it on a whim again!

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    Thats a great question, I have the exact same conditions, NYC, east facing windows, and no buildings in the way.
    I too would like to know if you can grow, maybe a Phal? I am currently growing a Masdevalia rolfiana. I've got it under alot of plants that give it tons of shade. It seems to like it there, but no blooms yet.

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    My first thought was phal, depending on how strong the morning light is. Also some paphs would probably do well there.

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    You guys must be on the river - east windows with no buildings! I used to be on the Upper East Side for a gazillion years before I moved up here.

    Phals and Paphs were my first thought as well.

    You could always consider a grow light.

    Julie

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    If you're in Manhattan, an east-facing window is actually a little bit southeast, since the island is a tad counter-clockwise from true north-south. I have an expanse of south-facing windows that is actually a little bit southwest. Anyway, an unobstructed east window gives you quite a bit of light if you need it. And it would give you the light without the afternoon heat of a western exposure, which means less of a chance to burn the leaves.

    From a light perspective, I think you could grow pretty much anything you want, except maybe terete leaved vandas or standard cymbidiums. Standard catts would of course appreciate full sun, relatively close to the window (i.e. 1.5 feet or so), except maybe during the really hot days in the summer. Everything else that appreciates lower light can be grown as well, just farther from the glass.

    The biggest problem of an apartment, if you ask me, is the dreadful humidity throughout most of the year.

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    Tell me about it, humidity is so low I have to bath in chap stick. Just kidding, but still its low.
    Actually I live in Queens, which to me is still NYC, same Mayor, same Police dept. etc..
    Anyway, I think I am facing EESE, if there is such a thing. I get lots and lots of sun in the summer mornings. And just lots of sun in the winter mornings.

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'll start checking out Paphs.

    Jason, you mentioned that 'standard cymbidiums' wouldn't work. Does that mean there is a type of cymbidium that would? I had given up on getting one since someone told me to bloom they need to spend summer outdoors.

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    Phals and paphs would both work well. Plenty of light for the sun-loving paphs, and you can always stick a humidifier near the plants if you apartment is small enough. I can attest that, with few exceptions, both these genera will grow fine despite the dreadfully low humidity, as long as you don't let them get bone dry.

    Standard cymbidiums are tough to bloom properly without summering outside. I'm not saying it can't be done indoors, if you stick them right up against the glass (and avoid sunburn), but they do need a cold snap in the fall to bloom, where night temps have to drop into the mid to upper 40s. That would be impossible unless you had a balcony or porch or something.

    Miniature cymbidiums may work, although I have never tried. I think you could probably give enough light for these guys but it all depends on how low the temps have to be for them to set spikes. I have an ensifolium on my windowsill that spiked within a few months after I got it last year, but I'm waiting for it to rebloom before saying definitively "it can be done."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jmoney

    Standard cymbidiums are tough to bloom properly without summering outside. I'm not saying it can't be done indoors, if you stick them right up against the glass (and avoid sunburn), but they do need a cold snap in the fall to bloom, where night temps have to drop into the mid to upper 40s. That would be impossible unless you had a balcony or porch or something.
    Trust me, this is totally possible in my building. They put the heat on when the temps go up into the 70's but in the fall when the temps drop into the 40's they forget to put the heat on.

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    well if it gets into the 40s your room I think you have a criminal case against your landlord. 60 degrees in my apartment in the winter is enough to make me turn up the heat, and I like it cold.

    I suppose you could try utilizing a cold draft but that would be difficult to control.

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