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Miltonia vs Miltoniopsis

This is a discussion on Miltonia vs Miltoniopsis within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; I need some help please with my new arrivals. I just ordered what I thought ...

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  1. #1
    Linda3406's Avatar
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    Default Miltonia vs Miltoniopsis

    I need some help please with my new arrivals. I just ordered what I thought was Miltonias, but on further study, I found them to be Miltoniopsis. Absolutedly stunning plants to my surprise were in flower. I ordered plants not in bloom and got the extra bonus. Now, to the question. I live in Texas (close to Fort Worth)and from what I am reading about my orchids, they prefer more humidity than Miltonias. I don't think I am going to be able to grow these in my windowsill with my other orchids. Should I provide a terrarium setting for these? Am I going to be able to grow these where I live?
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  2. #2
    hcubed's Avatar
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    From what I have heard Miltoniopsis are a bit difficult because they like it cooler and damp. That being said, I have one and a Nelly Isler (not a Milt, but fairly similar) and both seem quite happy. But then again I specialize in damp, cool weather, unlike Texas.

    You should watch out for leaf pleating, since that is a sign of not enough water. I think I would start off treating them like most other oncidium-type (roots are similar) and be careful not to rot the roots through over watering. If the leaves pleat too much (I have a little, but it's pretty minimal), start watering more (assuming roots are good). Since they have pseudobulbs, they ought to give you a little lee-way at the beginning.

  3. #3
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    Default !!

    Linda,

    Terrarium is bad bad bad for these plants. The lack of air circulation causes them to rot and they need coolish..not warmish temps.

    These are hard plants for beginners. I've been growing for over 10 years and just in the last three or so I've been able to grow and bloom the dreaded Miltoniopsis.

    I'll tell you how I do it..

    These plants really don't need much more light than you would give a Phalaenopsis, but they like tons more humidity. I have my three miltoniopsis in an East-facing window right next to an electrosonic humidifer--they like this setup. Don't let them get too dry or they pleat. I keep these plants the "wettest" of all in my collection (even more moist than Phals).

    I am a polar bear so I enjoy cold night temps when I'm sleeping. I have a min/max thermometer and in my growing area the temps range from 62-82 pretty much all year round (My low drops to about 58 in the house in January/February because we don't run the heat hardly at all unless it's to warm up the house to about 75 during the day.)

    These are nice plants and very rewarding when you master them. I think I killed at least 10-12 before I got it right...

    Good luck!

  4. #4
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    I would grow them in sphag, their roots will like the moisture. I just got a milt too maybe a year from blooming

    I had (well my mom had, I was young) a milt on a kitchen window sill, east facing, without supplimental humidity. It grew well and bloomed regularly, more than once a year. and fragrant too. and I remember it came from a local conservatory as a seedling. Unfortunately spider mites killed a bunch of plants that time and this one was a victim , I didn't diagnose the problem correctly. Besides it catching a pest I think it grew very well on that window!

  5. #5
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    Sphag always rots my roots, but TX is a lot drier, so who knows (I currently have 71% in house with no extra help at all).

    Btw, I've been wondering what the conditions are like in Edmonton, too....

  6. #6
    JUDIUK is offline Senior Member
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    Alternatively you could pack them up and send them to me lol! Judi

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    Alternatively to potting up in sphag, Linda, you might try a top dressing of sphag. I remember a grower who came to discuss oncids -- which can also be prone to leaf pleating issues -- at an os meeting mentioning that he did this for many of his oncids because he kept getting either heavy leaf pleating [not enough moisture] or rot [too much]. The light top dressing of sphag kept more moisture/humidity around the roots w/o excessive watering.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcubed View Post
    Btw, I've been wondering what the conditions are like in Edmonton, too....
    The main problems in edmonton are cold winters and furnaces tend to dry out the air. Also increasing humidty over 50% can cause problems when the water condenses on cold surfaces like the frame of the house, causing it to rot. I've noticed problems (mildew growing on condensation), and I have moved the collection to another area where humidity does not condense.
    In the summer humidity is better and easier to control, but it can get too hot for certain orchids. seems temps keep going hotter every year in the summer now...

    ...I am very jealous of those near the coast like in Vancouver. The weather and humidity seems perfect.

    For fine rooted plants like a milt, sphag doesn't seem to be a problem. Even if it does dry out too much. I prefer sphag for there over fine bark because I am not watering as much. I keep the sphag loose as possible.

    that milt we had didn't seem to have many problems... we didn't care for humidity or temperature either. It was planted in bark mix, probably a decaying one too. I also don't think we empied the saucer under pots either, my mom never does. Somehow I think it dried fast enough to prevent rot, I guess Edmonton can be dry.

  9. #9
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    Copied from the web . Could not put the link . Gin
    Those Other Miltonias

    Charles and Margaret Baker

    For many years growers used the name Miltonia to refer to those plants known as the 'cool growing' or 'Colombian' Miltonias. The other members of the genus, mostly from Brazil, were pretty much ignored. Now that the most well known and commonly grown plants have been reclassified to the genus Miltoniopsis, those other Miltonias, the Brazilian species, are left as the only Miltonias.

    These Brazilian plants are members of a rather small genus which, according to current thinking, is made up of nine species, Miltonia anceps, M. candida, M. clowesii, M. cuneata, M. flavescens, M. kayasimae, M. regnellii, M. russelliana, and M. spectabilis. Two additional species, which were once considered Miltonias, M. schroederiana and M. warscewiczii, have been reclassified in recent years. They are now known as Oncidium schroederiana and Oncidium fuscatum.

    Miltonia species have large, attractive, long lasting flowers and they are generally considered easy to cultivate, but for some reason they have been ignored by most of the orchid community. Some feel that their lack of popularity is probably because they do not look like their more famous and widely grown cousins, Miltoniopsis (pansy orchids). We feel that there must be more to it than this, however. More than 100 years ago, in his coverage of Miltonia candida, Veitch said, "Long known as one of the handsomest of the Brazilian Miltonias, but of which nothing has been recorded of its habitat or of its discovery". About Miltonia cuneata he said, "The first notice of Miltonia cuneata occurred in 1844, at which date it was cultivated by Messrs. Rollisson at their nursery at Tooting; many years afterwards it was sent to M. Verschaffelt's horticultural establishment at Ghent by a French correspondent, M. Pinel, from Brazil. Beyond this not a scrap if information is forthcoming respecting its habitat, its discoverer, or the date of its introduction". He reported this same lack of information for the other species as well, and today there has been very little added to this "wealth" of knowledge.

    We are indebted to Louis Hamilton Lima, an AOS member in Săo José dos Campos, Brazil, for the information he was able to provide on the habitat location and elevation for most of the Brazilian Miltonia species. Without his assistance, we simply could not have selected representative climatological data for these species.

    Not only has there been a lack of information about these plants, there has also been some erroneous information floating around. For many years they were referred to as, "the warm-growing Brazilian miltonias" in order to differentiate them from the "cool-growing Colombian miltonias". We now know that the cool-growing Colombian miltonias are, for the most part, actually intermediate to warm growing; and equipped with accurate habitat location and elevation information, we are able see that the warm-growing Brazilian miltonias are, for the most part, not actually warm-growing. Instead, most require cool to intermediate conditions.

    Miltonia species have not received the overall attention they deserve, but they are usually found in many of the more complete collections. In addition, specialty breeders have occasionally included them in hybridizing programs. The Brazilian species hybridize easily and well with most Brassia species, which also have 60 chromosomes. On the other hand, Miltonia warscewiczii (now Oncidium fuscatum), which has 56 chromosomes, crosses easily with many Oncidium species. For readers interested in exploring hybridizing with Miltonia species, there have been several excellent articles published on this subject over the last 20 years or so. They are listed in the bibliography at the end of this article. For the most part, the progeny generally possess hybrid vigor, and they tolerate a wide range of temperatures. As a result, they are usually very easy to grow and flower.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all your input ladies and gents This is my first day to be able to get back to the forum and it was nice to see people trying to help me. I have several yellow leaves on these orchids already. :-(

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