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Angraecum sesquipedale - is this odd?

This is a discussion on Angraecum sesquipedale - is this odd? within the Genus Specific forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Well, here's another definition I found: keiki -- A Hawaiian word referring to a baby ...

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  1. #11
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    Well, here's another definition I found:

    keiki -- A Hawaiian word referring to a baby plant produced asexually by an orchid plant, usually used when referring to Dendrobiums, Phalaenopsis, or Vandaceous orchids.

  2. #12
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    There are a couple of very excellent keiki threads buried in the forum that I've read.

    I've seen them on my own dends and on forum member's phals. They typically grow off a floral spike, or simply a cane (in my case of a dend). They're both root and leaf. That's why your shot looks more like a normal growth. If it's coming out of the ground, it's a new growth. If it's mid-air with both leaf and root, clinging to some other growth then it's a keiki.

    Someone help please, where's that awesome thread where Louis highlighted keikis coming out of keikis?

    Julie

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    Not to fly in the face of the Twilight Zone (other dimension), but croaking looks to me like the last thing that plant is about to do. Gin is right on here; the plant is developing keikis to develop more roots. Nothing wrong at all there.

    I've always used the word keiki very loosely, in way of Kev's definition, not confining it to plantlets that develop only on inflorescences, but refering to plantlets that develop anywhere asexually. Since monopodials don't grow sideways, I've always called new growths on them "Keikis." On Dendrobiums, I call plantlets that develop on the node of a cane a keiki. Whether this is all correct or not, I don't know.

    Julie, keikis coming out of keikis? I think that was a dendrobium pic...

    Here's a Phal keiki thread... http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...ead.php?t=1549

    Julie, this is the thread you started with the Dend. pics at the bottom....
    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...ead.php?t=1649

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    Well, the issue about the plants health is settled as far as I am concerned and why it's doing what it's doing. I was just going to post another definition I found in a quick Google search:

    Keiki- A Hawaiian term for the offshoot produced on the stem, spike, or base of an orchid.

    I guess my intention wasn't to start a debate about what is a keiki, but in a way I'm glad it happened. I think I've always been somewhat confused as to when its a keiki and when it's just a new growth.

    I also think it is a term used incorrectly a lot. Last summer someone sent me some Dend. loddigesii "keikis". When I got them, they really looked like cuttings: just some pieces of the plant without roots. I'm still struggling with these pups.

    Kev

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    Well, since monopodials don't develop new growths as part of their maturation, I think keiki is correctly applied there to baby plants that develop as offshoots. On Dends, if the baby develops anywhere aerially on the cane, I've always heard it called a keiki. I don't think a growth extending from the base of the plant is quite the seperate entity a keiki is.

    Anyway--hope your loddigesii pieces root for you! Sounds like the Dendrobium version of a stem prop....

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