Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Results 1 to 10 of 10
Like Tree11Likes
  • 6 Post By Dorsetman
  • 3 Post By Halloamey
  • 2 Post By Susie11

Red root tips on phals and another question

This is a discussion on Red root tips on phals and another question within the Genus Specific forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Hi folks! I recently moved my 3 largest phals (all NOID hybrids) to a large ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    TwoStems's Avatar
    TwoStems is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Ali
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    the weird ones
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Northeastern CT
    Posts
    961
    Member's Country Flag

    Default Red root tips on phals and another question

    Hi folks!
    I recently moved my 3 largest phals (all NOID hybrids) to a large window that gets sun most of the day. I was hoping maybe it would force them to spike since I'm not sure they're getting enough light where I normally keep them. I noticed that the tips of the roots on the healthiest one are a deep maroon. Is this just from getting lots of light, like the leaves do sometimes? Should it take it as a sign to move them a bit further away from the window?


    On another note: I'm concerned about one of the others (that only seems to ever have 3 leaves at a time); the newest leaf is green and looks healthy but is much softer to the touch than its other leaves - or the leaves of any other phal I have. I have it in s/h and the roots were pretty good when I put it in there. I can see a couple of thick green roots through the translucent pot, but I don't think it has a whole lot of roots to begin with. Should I just keep an eye on it? It's in the same big window with lots of light.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is online now Senior Member
    Real Name
    Geoff Hands
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya ?
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    England, South coast.
    Posts
    3,238
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Chlorophyll occurs in Phalaenopsis roots - probably one stage in its production happens there- which by the way does not mean that they must be grown in trasparent pots to allow light to get to them - the chlorophyll cannot actually do anything in roots,I won't go any further about why not, just at present, but will explain if so asked.
    But there are actually two forms of chlorophyll ; one is red, the other is green. Most plants have a mixture of both , and differences in the colour of leaves is due to different proportions in the mixture. Plants turn red with excess light, because the red form of chlorophyll is being favoured.
    Here in UK by the way we have some red leaved trees - Copper Beech for example, and I have an ornamental apple ( Malus something or other) outside my front door, with very dark red, almost black leaves. I guess the green form of chlorophyll hardly exists in them.

  3. #3
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is online now Senior Member
    Real Name
    Geoff Hands
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya ?
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    England, South coast.
    Posts
    3,238
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    And by the way, light is not very important for production of Phalaenopsis flower spikes ; temperature is the key. Below60 degrees F., flower spikes will be initiated, but the plant won't grow. Above 70 the plant will grow well, but won't flower. Commercial production is geared around th4se known facts - the plants are kept permanently warm until of the required size, then permanently cool until the spikes are started and growing nicely, then the plants are sold. Light is only important in the sense of some light is needed for growth- but Phals are not high light plants.

  4. #4
    TwoStems's Avatar
    TwoStems is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Ali
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    the weird ones
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Northeastern CT
    Posts
    961
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Thanks Geoff! I've basically been trying everything I can think of, this was just a new "abuse" to attempt getting spikes. At the very least, the temperature will be higher than it is in my normal grow area and once I move them maybe the shift will initiate spikes. I'm thinking my basement would be a great place for a temp drop, but I need to get some more grow lights if I move them there. They won't get enough (if any) light otherwise.

  5. #5
    Halloamey's Avatar
    Halloamey is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Amey Bhide
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya alliance
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Pune, India
    Posts
    5,363
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Also with temperature duration of light is a key factor in flower spike initiation in Phalaenopsis. Most Phal. species are subtropical where every fall they are subjected to shorter days, these shorter days coupled with temperature differences initiate spikes. The same is true of most sub-tropical orchids.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorsetman View Post
    And by the way, light is not very important for production of Phalaenopsis flower spikes ; temperature is the key. Below60 degrees F., flower spikes will be initiated, but the plant won't grow. Above 70 the plant will grow well, but won't flower. Commercial production is geared around th4se known facts - the plants are kept permanently warm until of the required size, then permanently cool until the spikes are started and growing nicely, then the plants are sold. Light is only important in the sense of some light is needed for growth- but Phals are not high light plants.

  6. #6
    Halloamey's Avatar
    Halloamey is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Amey Bhide
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya alliance
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Pune, India
    Posts
    5,363
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Geoff even though the two chlorophylls exist (A and B) the dark red color of the leaves or roots is not due to Chlorophylls but due to anthocyanins.Chlorophyll A is green in color and Chlorophyll B is yellow in color. There exists a Chlorophyll C which is reddish brown in color but it is found only in certain marine algae but not in any land plants. Chlorophyll B and C can only act as accessory pigment, Chlorophyll A constitutes the main reaction centre, so the green chlorophyll is essential for all plants and algae. Anthocyanins on the other hand are color pigments that act as a natural sun screen just as melanin does in animals. The dark red/ brown color absorbs the UV and the blue light which has the most amount of energy and can cause photo damage to chlorophyll reaction centres.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorsetman View Post
    Chlorophyll occurs in Phalaenopsis roots - probably one stage in its production happens there- which by the way does not mean that they must be grown in trasparent pots to allow light to get to them - the chlorophyll cannot actually do anything in roots,I won't go any further about why not, just at present, but will explain if so asked.
    But there are actually two forms of chlorophyll ; one is red, the other is green. Most plants have a mixture of both , and differences in the colour of leaves is due to different proportions in the mixture. Plants turn red with excess light, because the red form of chlorophyll is being favoured.
    Here in UK by the way we have some red leaved trees - Copper Beech for example, and I have an ornamental apple ( Malus something or other) outside my front door, with very dark red, almost black leaves. I guess the green form of chlorophyll hardly exists in them.

  7. #7
    Susie11's Avatar
    Susie11 is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Phragmipediums, paphiopedilums
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    London U.K
    Posts
    679
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I can't add anything other than fat jewel tipped roots are usually an indication of a healthy plant. Good growing.

  8. #8
    TwoStems's Avatar
    TwoStems is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Ali
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    the weird ones
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Northeastern CT
    Posts
    961
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    In an attempt to answer my own question regarding the leaves, I think it was simply too hot where I had them. Or maybe too bright. I moved them back to my normal growing space and they've started to stiffen up again. Looks like I may have sunburned a couple of leaves, but otherwise they seem alright. Looks like I'll have to try plan E haha

  9. #9
    coeruleo's Avatar
    coeruleo is offline Night Bloomer
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Vanda
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1,302

    Default

    as long as they were not in full sun, they should bloom better and grow stronger with more light. but this depends on really whether or not they were getting enough light before moving them. the red root tips are from stornger light, and not really harmful in my experience. when moving orchids to stronger light, do it gradually and you will have better luck. suddenly going from shade to bright light is an adjustment, and can cause problems with growth, by stunting leaves, going dormant and stopping growth, and burn marks even if not in full sun. as for the 'soft growth' all my phals's new leaves are soft at first, then harden off when they stop growing, so unless the leaf is otherwise growing unusually, might not be an issue at all.

  10. #10
    TwoStems's Avatar
    TwoStems is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Ali
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    the weird ones
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Northeastern CT
    Posts
    961
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I noticed after a few days that all the leaves on all 3 phals were softer, so I think they were in too strong of a light. I may be able to move them back a little from the window with better luck.

Similar Threads

  1. Are purple root tips normal?
    By sand_tiger86 in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: June 22nd, 2012, 12:10 AM
  2. Re-Potted Phals dying from root rot
    By sewcrazy64 in forum New Growers: Ask the Senior Members
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: October 18th, 2009, 07:58 PM
  3. vandas -root tips in water?
    By conjuay in forum Genus Specific
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: October 17th, 2009, 08:23 PM
  4. shriveling vanda root tips
    By nyortiga in forum Orchid Ailments / The Compost Pile
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: August 21st, 2009, 07:22 PM
  5. Root Rot on Phals in S/H
    By stacey8989 in forum Semi Hydro / Lights / Greenhouses / Accessories
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: December 12th, 2008, 05:04 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.