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  • 3 Post By PaphMadMan
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Phalaeonopsis - Hybrid or Species?

This is a discussion on Phalaeonopsis - Hybrid or Species? within the Genus Specific forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; Not sure what the difference is- could someone explain. I noticed that some of my ...

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  1. #1
    Trab824's Avatar
    Trab824 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Phalaeonopsis - Hybrid or Species?

    Not sure what the difference is- could someone explain. I noticed that some of my Phals after the bloom cycle will keep their spikes green and may even bloom from them again whereas others the spikes turn brown, eventually drying and dying off. Is this the difference between Species and Hybrid? Thanks!

  2. #2
    PaphMadMan is offline Senior Member
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    Species are naturally occurring forms found in the wild, though many are grown as greenhouse or house plants and may have been raised by man for many generations. Hybrids are any that have ancestry from more than one species. A few hybrids occur naturally, but most are man-made and may have many species in their background. Both species and hybrids may have spikes that persist and rebloom, and both may have spikes that bloom once and die. Some species normally rebloom and some don't. Hybrids will take after their ancestors either way. In many cases it may not be possible to tell if a plant is a species or a hybrid just by looking at it.
    Last edited by PaphMadMan; May 19th, 2017 at 08:51 AM.

  3. #3
    Yug's Avatar
    Yug
    Yug is offline Mostly-Species Snob
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    With a species, generation after generation it is still relatively like the parent plants. With a hybrid of two different species or more complex hybrids, successive generations may resemble one parent other the other, and maybe a mixture of characteristics of both parents.

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