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Leggy Cucumbers

This is a discussion on Leggy Cucumbers within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; For those who have a garden may or may not know this by starting from ...

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  1. #1
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    Default Leggy Cucumbers

    For those who have a garden may or may not know this by starting from seeds. This is my second year growing and i never encountered "leggy" seedlings. I wanted to get my cucumbers outside sooner since its so late but should have waited. All of the stems shriveled up and aren't supporting the leaves anymore.

    **What i learned= They're probably not getting enough light. Apparently south facing windows aren't enough. If you get leggy seedlings and your ready to transplant, cover the stem under the ground up to the first set of leaves.**

    I'm just really upset cause it's really the only crop i cared for. No pickles this year.
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  2. #2
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    Molly Taco is offline Re-member WHAT ??
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    Looks like it could be damping off syndrome. Try watering them with a little fungicide when you plant the seeds and again when they sprout. Or better yet start them in the ground.
    Cin

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    What happens between transplanting that creates the fungus?

    I'm about to search for natural fungicides since this is supposed to be an "organic" garden. If you know any please let me know

  4. #4
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    It is a fungus that attacks the seedling at the soil level. Using sterile seed starting mix is always suggested when growing your own seedlings you can also cover the seeds with sterilized sand to help prevent this syndrome. I think Physan is organic but check with the others.
    Cin

  5. #5
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    Well i should have taken some pictures of the two left in the house. I kept two inside because they were smaller and i didnt want to shock them by putting them outside. They had a bunch of black spots on them. It ended up rubbing off and i assumed at first it must have been from the flies or something that are in the house from the girlfriend who doesnt know how to shut a door.

    I still have these two which seem to be doing okay..They are about 5 inches big with 4 leave sprouts each. Tonight im planting some more seeds in hope for at least SOME cucumbers this season. So as i water the dirt i should water it with some fungiside?

  6. #6
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    I should also mention that some natural fungicides are:>

    Apple Cider Vinegar - Use 1-2 tbls per gallon of water for a mild fungicide or acidic liquid fertilizer. Like alcohol can be a natural herbicide if too much is used in tea. Most white vinegars are made from petroleum products. Apple cider vinegar can contain up to 30 trace elements.

    Corn meal - Use as a topdressing or in a tea for fungal control.

    Compost teas - This multi-purpose fluid can contain beneficial microbes and soluble nutrients that can be a mild fungicide and disease controller
    Also a light dusting of lime on plants acts as a fungal control

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