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OK, so what’s this all about?

This is a discussion on OK, so what’s this all about? within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; Originally Posted by TundraKev If you do decide to try the fridge and you have ...

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  1. #11
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    Orchidzrule is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TundraKev
    If you do decide to try the fridge and you have a frost free model, be careful. Since frost free refrigerators operate on the principle of pulling moisture out of the interior of the fridge (that's why they're frost free), they will also pull the moisture our of anything you store in them. I've heard stories of people having their bulbs severely dehydrated by this.

    I leave mine out until early to mid October and then dig the entire plant and put the whole thing in an open paper bag. You must let the foliage ripen naturally before removing. Once all the foliage is brown and crispy, I take it off and store the bulb again in a paper bag. Do not use plastic, because the bulb can rot very easily.
    How about using plastic just for the time it's in the fridge? The frost free environment (i.e. removing moisture) combined with cool temps should prevent rot, yet the plastic should retain some moisture to prevent desiccation.

    I'd be interested in your thoughts.

    Cheers,

    Rob

  2. #12
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    Rob

    You're right. The colder the better for preventing rot. I stored some lilies in my fridge all winter in dry peat in plastic containers with tight fitting lids. It worked perfectly. I think I checked them once or twice all winter and did not have any rot.

    Kev

  3. #13
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    RSJ . I am with you I did have quite a few and never got them to rebloom after the first time , gave them to a friend when we moved . I have one I grew from seed don't remember what I crossed with what it is about 6 years old , I tried the cool down ect . and got 0 they don't like me . I enjoyed the pictures Gin

  4. #14
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    Forgot we were talking about amaryllis here. I still don't think the fridge would be a good idea for them - other things yes, but not these. Some bulbs will start to rot if kept too cold. Amaryllis do not need or want real cold temps for their dormancy. I think around 50 F is probably ideal. I would have to check that.

    I spent some time in Israel and remember seeing amaryllis grown year round as garden plants. At least the part of Israel I was in did not have real cold winters.

    Gin

    Light, light, light for these pups. I've bloomed 'em from seed in four years. That seems to be about the norm for these.

  5. #15
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    I'll give more light , Thanks . when I lived in So. Ca. they grew and bloomed in the yard . Gin

  6. #16
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    I've been growing these since 1991 but due to limited space I only have 4 varieties in 4 huge pots. Here in Hong Kong, the winter get cold to as low as 30's to 40's but only for a few days. Mostly, its high 50's to 70's, and they remain evergreen. Sometimes I force them to go dormant by cutting all the remaining leaves and stop watering and feeding. But sometimes its impossible to keep them dry all winter because they are not protected from the rain. Whether they get their dry rest period or not, they still bloom every year. So, I don't think rest period is the secret to get them to bloom, I think its the amount of sun and food they recieve when growing.

    Mine get full sun all year round and feed them twice a month.

  7. #17
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    Tanya

    I think you are right. I know the sun and fertilizer is very, very important for these. I also think storing them too cool could damage the flower buds inside the bulb. Did you know these form their buds inside the bulb 18 months before they bloom? I thought that was kind of a interesting fact.

    Kev

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TundraKev
    Tanya

    Did you know these form their buds inside the bulb 18 months before they bloom? I thought that was kind of a interesting fact.

    Kev
    I didn't know that Kev, and thanks for sharing it.

    Here's something else I don't know.

    Ever since I started growing these, I always pluck the flowers promptly whenever they started wilting. I don't want the plant to grow seedpods. I lay the spent flowers on top of the medium, thinking that the flowers will breakdown and go back into the soil. What surprises me is that the base/ovary part of the flower start swelling after couple of days. They will continue to grow until some critters eat them or they turn brown and shrivel.

    You can see from the pic what I am trying to say. These pods were nothing but a 'stem' when I plucked the flowers one week ago.

    Any explanation as to why these continues to develop despite the fact that they are not getting anymore nourishment from the plant? Where's the food coming from? The petals?

    Any info is much appreciated. This has been a puzzle to me for several years.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #19
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    Tanya

    That is so cool. Thanks. I have no idea why they do that or why they even can. We need Louis. He knows everything about plants.

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