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Changes in zone hardiness maps

This is a discussion on Changes in zone hardiness maps within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; Data points are a hobby of mine. BTW; I hadn't seen any updated hardiness zone ...

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  1. #11
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    Sue
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    Data points are a hobby of mine.

    BTW; I hadn't seen any updated hardiness zone maps. Helps explain the persistance of my gladeoli, which ought to have died according to the old map.

    It's a good point though, about the snow cover. The snow helps keep the ground from getting too far below 0C, and serves as insulation. We don't get enough cold for it to make too much of a difference here, but I would imagine it would make a big, big difference up north.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orchidzrule

    I keep hearing about global warming and other climate change. I can't say it seems much different. The winters sometimes seem a little warmer, but other times seem brutally cold! Actually, we've had some rather cold (even by our standards LOL) summers in recent years.

    I was told the supposed reason for these changes are they are now taking other factors into account besides minimum winter temperatures. They include (but may not be limited to) humidity levels, average total precipitation and amount of snow cover.

    Rob
    Rob

    I guess I would never use these hardiness maps as an indicator of global warming. You're right, more factors are being taken into consideration when they publish these things. Actually, I think the reason I got bumped up a zone was because they now recognize the heat island effect of living in a big city. I live smack right in the middle of Mpls and it's always warmer here than 10 miles out in the burbs.

    The thing that is the hardest on my garden is the lack of snow cover in the winter now. I won't mulch for winter. I know I should, but I won't do it. Since my garden is SO full, I almost welcome some of the winter losses. It opens up some more room to try something else. I know, that's sick, but true.

    Sue

    That's really good info. I really don't think there is much debate in the majority of the scientific community anymore. The climate is changing and very fast. I would think if it were some sort of natural cycle it would have been more gradual. When you look at the huge changes that have occurred in the Arctic regions in just the last few decades, it gets very scary.

    I think another thing people forget is that global warming does not mean that every place on earth is going to have warmer temps all the time. One of the biggest effects of this seemingly insignificant rise in the plant's temperature is the affect this has on weather patterns and the jet stream. Some areas may experience warmer winters or summers, but other places may actually get cooler. Areas that once had good rainfall may become very dry or just the opposite may occur. The norm is not the norm anymore.

    Enough from me.

  3. #13
    RSJ
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    Well that was very interesting information, Sue. Thanks! Pavement, asphalt, skyscrapers that block airflow, loss of acres and acres of plant-life to add moisture back to the air...

    Off to ponder now.

    RSJ

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TundraKev
    Rob

    I guess I would never use these hardiness maps as an indicator of global warming. You're right, more factors are being taken into consideration when they publish these things. Actually, I think the reason I got bumped up a zone was because they now recognize the heat island effect of living in a big city. I live smack right in the middle of Mpls and it's always warmer here than 10 miles out in the burbs.

    The thing that is the hardest on my garden is the lack of snow cover in the winter now. I won't mulch for winter. I know I should, but I won't do it. Since my garden is SO full, I almost welcome some of the winter losses. It opens up some more room to try something else. I know, that's sick, but true.


    Enough from me.
    Oh, Kev, I could never get enough of you!

    Seriously, the point about heat islands created by cities is impressive. A good friend of mine is a fairly keen, albeit novice, gardener. He lives at the extreme NE corner of Winnipeg, whereas I live in the south part of the city, although not way out. He always seems to get colder overnight temperatures at his house than I get. He'll see heavier frost, and especially in early winter, more accumulation of the white crap in a snowfall than I see. I have another friend who lives right downtown and his apartment still has live impatiens after all mine have been killed by frost in fall.

    I'm not sure, though, if hardiness zones take this into effect--these are more along the line of microclimates than real climate zones.

    Cheers,

    Rob

  5. #15
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    Rob

    I think they do take the heat island thing into account if they are big enough. On one map I saw, the Twin Cities was very clearly designated as a zone 5. All the surrounding area was still a zone 4.

    Microclimates are very cool and strange. I know I have them in my own yard, but I've never really taken the time to figure them all out. This year, two clematis tangutica next to my house didn't make it. A couple of others (same clematis) about 15 feet away and next to a fence came through just fine.

    Tis all very strange.

  6. #16
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    Kev,

    Would you consider the ones that didn't do well, 'micro-clematis'?

    Julie

  7. #17
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    Nooooooooooo

    Especially since they grew almost all the way to the top of my house last year. I have a 2 1/2 story house.

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