Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Changes in zone hardiness maps

This is a discussion on Changes in zone hardiness maps within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; Is our climate really changing? This has been kind of a hot topic for at ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    TundraKev's Avatar
    TundraKev is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    971

    Default Changes in zone hardiness maps

    Is our climate really changing? This has been kind of a hot topic for at least a year or more n the gardening community. I'm still kind of up in the air on this one. I know winters in MN have not been what I usually consider normal for a very good number of years. I honestly cannot remember the last time we even came close to a -20 F temp. That used to be expected for at least a week or so every winter. Now, if we have a few -8 or -10 nights during winter, that's considered cold. We are getting sooooo soft up here in Tundraland.

    I think it is kind of interesting that some organizations are coming out with updated Zone Hardiness Maps. It looks like some folks believe there are changes occurring.

    Here's one I recently came across from the Arborday Org.

    http://www.arborday.org/media/zones.cfm

    It's kind of cool because you can look up your zone by zipcode and also compare the changes to an older map.

    In a way, these changes can be kind of deceptive since winter temps - whether they are high or low - are not the only factors influencing a particular plant's hardiness in your area. For example: Even though our winter temps haven't been bitterly cold, we also don't seem to get the snowcover we once did. In Mpls. we've gone from zone 4 to 5 and I've still been losing many more things in my garden than in the past. That snowcover was really important for protecting plants.

    Anyway, thought some of you might be interested in the map.

  2. #2
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    I'm not buying it. Too few data points. They're comparing 2004 to 1990. Global weather patterns are inherently cyclical with long periods. That's not to say we aren't trending warmer, but I wouldn't accept that until I saw about 100 years of data. In fifteen more years we could easily be cooling off.

    But for now, the cannas should be happy!

    Julie

  3. #3
    TundraKev's Avatar
    TundraKev is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    971

    Default

    I agree with you Julie. About a year ago, I came across another revised map put out by the USDA. I just can't find the blasted thing now. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!! The map was much more detailed than this one, but also made some interesting changes. I was also bumped up a zone on that map.

    I hope the cannas do well this summer. Last year, it was just too cold and nothing did that great.



    (see what I'm really trying to do here is create a lot of debate, controversy, strongly worded outbursts from folks - you know - lots of drama. That can be fun. )

  4. #4
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    Right now the cannas are all over my kitchen counter. I need to bag 'em and get 'em started. Don't know if I'm up for bringing them in over the winter. (You need to get a life, man!)

    If they don't make it (the new map suggests they now have a better chance!), it will just leave room for the tall beareded iris I just ordered.

    Julie
    (thought the magazine article created plenty of debate, controversy and strongly worded outbursts. You, sir, are a glutton!)

  5. #5
    Orchidzrule's Avatar
    Orchidzrule is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Rob Parsons
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Phragmipedium
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, CANADA
    Posts
    933
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Ah, the wonderful world of hardiness zones! Unlike Kev, *I* was recently bumped *down* a zone. I was in three, now in two. At any rate, does this mean I can no longer grow zone three plants in my gardn? I say hell no!

    Actually, I often urge people to push the limits and plant Zone 4 HERBACIOUS perennials. By contrast, not woody ones. Herbacious perennials get covered by snow in my part of the world for months. If you desire, you can augment it by putting mulch down in the fall before the white stuff arrives. Woody plants are much harder to protect.

    I keep hearing about global warming and other climate change. I can't say it seems much different. The winters sometimes seem a little warmer, but other times seem brutally cold! Actually, we've had some rather cold (even by our standards LOL) summers in recent years.

    I was told the supposed reason for these changes are they are now taking other factors into account besides minimum winter temperatures. They include (but may not be limited to) humidity levels, average total precipitation and amount of snow cover.

    Anyway, gardening is getting to be fun now--my scilla has been blooming for a couple of weeks now, there are buds on my tulips and the lilies look healthy. Both of the latter look better in cages--necessary to protect against the damn rabbits!

    Cheers,

    Rob

  6. #6
    RSJ
    RSJ is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    319

    Default

    I'm not buying it either. 30 years ago, we were on our way to a massive chilling of the environment as the ozone layer was supposed to disappear, according to "experts". Now it's global warming we're up against, according to some of the same experts.

    I think they are no more likely to be accurate in the short term than the TV weatherman is about tomorrow's weather. Short term in the course of nature is probably even longer than 100 years.

    All I know is that every single year for the last 10 years I've lived here, they've predicted drought in the summer and massive flooding in the fall. Neither extreme has really happened. This year what are they predicting? Drought for the summer. True, our snowpack in the mountains was abysmal, but then we could end up with a summer like a few we've had where it rained all summer.

    RSJ

  7. #7
    TundraKev's Avatar
    TundraKev is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    971

    Default

    We're all doomed, doomed I say.
    You're just in a total state of denial.
    Repent now while you still have time.



    I'm just too tired to say much else right now, but I might later.

  8. #8
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    Yeah, if you get over your fear,

    Tell the TRUTH about the Magazine...
    (Talk about denial...)

    Julie

    PS - Consuela, where the heck are my peanuts!!!

  9. #9
    Sue's Avatar
    Sue
    Sue is offline Evil Genius
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Some information on global warming:

    1. Here's a nice site on global warming from some folks whose homeland is being made inhabitable:

    http://www.janesoceania.com/oceania_...ming/index.htm

    2. Some points from the Union of Concerned Scientists:

    • Since the beginning of the 20th century, Earth's mean surface temperature has increased by about 1.1°F (0.6°C).

    • Over the last 40 years, which is the period with the most reliable data, the temperature increased by about 0.5°F (0.2-0.3°C).

    • Warming in the 20th century is greater than at any time during the past 400 to 600 years.

    • Seven of the 10 warmest years in the 20th century occurred in the 1990s. In fact, the hottest year since reliable instrumental temperature measurements began was 1998, when global temperatures spiked due to one of the strongest El Nińos on record.

    3. Some nice data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change:

    (a) graph showing average temperatures over the last 1000 years. Notice how everything gets all crazy around when industrialization takes off?

    (b) here's that section in detail

    (c) a nice graph of temperature changes, worldwide, since 1976.

  10. #10
    Piper's Avatar
    Piper is offline Hangs
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    Thanks, Sue - that's certainly more data points! I'm sold.

    Julie

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What are "road maps" on leaves??
    By jap42 in forum New Growers: Ask the Senior Members
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 11th, 2009, 07:48 PM
  2. Paph. venustum album 'Green Zone' x 'Condor Wintergreen' AM/AOS
    By grubea in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 6th, 2006, 04:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.