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Relics from the Age of the Dinosaurs...

This is a discussion on Relics from the Age of the Dinosaurs... within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; lol, sorry! After such a dramatic title I got me confused about what I was ...

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  1. #1
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    Default Relics from the Age of the Dinosaurs...

    lol, sorry! After such a dramatic title I got me confused about what I was gonna talk about...

    right, so anyways...

    Tree Ferns -

    are basically ferns that have a trunk which raise the leaf base (crown) above ground level.

    Tree Ferns are some of the earliest types of living plants on the planet. Some of the earliest forms of tree ferns include the Psaronius and Tempskya.

    These days, Dicksonia antarctica and Cyathea cooperi are the two most popularly grown species. They are particularly suitable when giving a garden an exotic tropical feel or a shady woodland look. Both are quite hardy, the Cyathea able to withstand full sun once established. Young plants can also be grown indoors in pots.

    Finally: Culture

    Cheers
    Tim

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    Tim

    That was really great info. I had no idea some of these could possibly be hardy to zone 6 with lots of protection. Maybe someday they will come up with one that I can grow (zone 5). That would be cool. I don't have any trees in my garden.

    Also didn't realize that the trunks were actually more or less a cluster of roots. That makes sense when you think about the tree fern we use for our orchids.

    So, where do they get the stuff we use? Is it harvested in the wild or do they have farms where they grow these plants just for harvesting? How is it harvested? Does the tree have to be cut down?

    Very curious.

  3. #3
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    Hey Kev,

    Did you not see the pic of the Dicksonia antarctica? u Know with the snow...

    Cold tolerant enough for ya?

    So, the bad part is, that they have to cut down the trees to get the mounts we use, what I don't know is whether it is possible to set the crown on the ground and for it to re-establish itself.

    It would basically be like root pruning right?

    Cheers
    Tim

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    Tim I did see that. Since everything is still green in that pic, I don't think the temps are much below freezing. You know it can still snow above 32 F. Around here, we often get our heaviest snowfalls when the temps are very warm - well, warm for us.

    I do remember seeing something on one of those nature channels about an island around Japan (I think) where the summer temps are very tropical and conditions are rainforest like, but in the winter they often get temps in the teens below 0 F. The whole rainforest just croaks in the winter, but everything comes back in the spring. Very strange. I also remember seeing a lot of tree ferns on that island. I think that's where a lot of the hardy bananas also come from - like Musa basjoo.

    I would think that if they have to cut these plants down so we can grow our orchids, tree fern is going to become hard to come by at some point in time. They don't seem to grow that fast.

    Don't know about rooting the crown. Seems like it might work.

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    Definitely great info, Tim. Thanks for that.

    We had one of these here which was sold as just "Australian Tree Fern" so I don't know which species, but it apparently got too cold in the room we were overwintering it in and it died. Or at least, that's what I thought happened. It was a relatively tall plant too, about four feet, and had been growing here for a while to get that high, so I was pretty crushed. Might have to see about getting one of those antarticas to replace it--I really love the look of these!

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