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Botany Field Trip & Carnivorous Plants

This is a discussion on Botany Field Trip & Carnivorous Plants within the The Jungle forums, part of the Land Plants category; These are cool! Found these at a bog we visited today for a Botany Class. ...

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  1. #1
    Tindomul1of9's Avatar
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    Default Botany Field Trip & Carnivorous Plants

    These are cool!
    Found these at a bog we visited today for a Botany Class. Collected them for my Herbarium that I will get graded on. Right now they are all being pressed and dried (such a shame, wish I could have kept some alive).

    Drosera sp? Its a sundew, such a pretty yet deadly(to bugs) thing.


    A Utricularia sp? Bladder wart, lives underwater and shoots one pretty orchid like yellow flower out of the water.

    And this is why they call it bladder wart, cuase it have tons of little bladder that are used to catch tiny aquatic crustaceans.


    And finally a way kool!! Sarracenia purporea. This is a Pitcher plant, the bug goes in, in search of food, and will NEVER come out There are little hairs on the inside of the cup that prevent the bugs from climbing out. They can't fly out cuase they are all wet. That and there is no room.


    These are all native to New York

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    Those are cool. Thanks for showing them to us!

    Cheers!
    BD

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    Those are great. So nice to see native plants.

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    Such interesting plants you found. When I'm out in wild places I always have the feeling that I'm missing lots of interesting things because I don't know that much about what I'm seeing. Did you go into the bog knowing what you were looking for? I don't understand why you press and dry specimens for your herbarium??

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    Hi,
    Mehera, I knew what I was looking for, but had never seen it first hand. I had to have the professor point the first few out to me before I noticed I was almost stepping on one, .
    We dry and press them so we can mount them on special mounting paper. A collection of these plants on mounted in that way is called an herbarium. Basically what it does is it preserves the plant for ever(or something like that), and shows future people characteristics of the plant. People can ID the plant from Herbarium collections alone.
    There are cases of Orchids that are only found in an Herbarium collection, and often times someone thinks they have rediscovered it. They then refer back to the original herbarium specimen to compare. Very useful stuff.

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    Cool trip Tindo ! thanks for sharing it with us Gin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tindomul1of9 View Post

    We dry and press them so we can mount them on special mounting paper. A collection of these plants on mounted in that way is called an herbarium.
    Oh I see now. I was thinking of vivarium, where the plants are maintained alive in a little microclimate. I took an entymology class 100 years ago where we had to make an insect collection--is it kind of the same idea? I guess none of the bugs we collected were rare, but I still felt bad about collecting them, over and over again, for student purposes.

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    Sounds great Tin! Which herbarium are you collecting for? Those should make very interesting mounts, I have seen a few Sarracenia and Nepenthes herbarium mounts, they look very interesting! How are you going to do that Bladderwort? Eeeeeks, haha! =)

    As for a comparison between collecting bugs and herbarium specimens, it is similar...

    Basically, an individual species is designated by a type. The new species (sp. nov.) will be designated by the initial plant found of that taxon, which we usually call a Holotype. The type can sometimes be a Holotype, Isotype, Paratype, Neotype, Allotype (do we use this for Catasetinae?), and many other types of types... sometimes, the type specimen for a single taxon will be the only known specimen to have existed, which is quite common among Pleurothallids (usually we just leave them alone for now without a description)... when additions to the taxon is made, they are to demonstrate morphological variabilty...

    So, if you were collecting bugs to donate into a collection, your specimens would be additions to that taxon... if a researcher came to study a specific taxon (like a specific species of bug) with multiple entries, he would have a further understanding on variabilty and morphological characteristics on that specific taxon... it's kinda late, hope this all made sense... otherwise, yell at me to fix it... =)

    -Pat

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    Hey Patrick! Nice to see you here too.
    Well, this collection of mine is going to the Queens College Herbarium. Not world famous, but a nice one.
    I checke the press today, it came out very nice. I split one of the pitchers in half and it shows some bugs still inside.

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  1. Carnivorous Plants
    By Styx in forum The Jungle
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    Last Post: November 17th, 2005, 04:01 AM

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