Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
Like Tree7Likes

Scotlands frozen tundra

This is a discussion on Scotlands frozen tundra within the A Kodak Moment: not necessarily plants... forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; LOL Thank you! Yes, plastic plants is the only way for me here in an ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #11
    Hoanui is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    152
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    LOL Thank you! Yes, plastic plants is the only way for me here in an area bereft of life!

    I was joking Paph lol, but seriously, the winters in the past two years have had really bad frosts - we had minus 15 last year and the year before but that was unusual as we normally get around minus 5 in a bad winter. Summer where I live is generally excellent here. We have a high amount of sunshine and last year I actually took the time to get a tan. It's rarely very hot here but when it is hot you know it!

  2. #12
    kiwiorchids's Avatar
    kiwiorchids is offline Plant Nut
    Real Name
    Jordan Healey
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    The Weird and the Wonderful!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    3,382
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I see you have a Chilean Rhubarb plant..... :S

    Love the Himalayan Blue Poppy, apparently if you want them perennial, lop of the first seasons buds, then every other year they are perennial. Otherwise you lose them.

  3. #13
    Hoanui is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    152
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Yep, and the Chilean Rhubarb is obviously unhappy cos it's getting bigger and bigger, as you would expect, every year. Thank fully we have plenty (sometimes) of rain to keep it happy. As for the poppies, I had no idea you could do that to them to make them perennial. I've had mine in the ground for three years now and they're spreading like mad and multiplying fabulously. I have to admit that I added four 80ltr bags of compost into the ground five years ago and that made the ground even better than it already was - I have sandy/silty loam soil. I think the New Zealand daisies are my faves tho'.

  4. #14
    pavel's Avatar
    pavel is offline change is the only constant
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    whatever will bloom
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,643
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    The fact the poppies are "spreading like mad" goes to show that you don't have to cut the first years flowers off.

    Jordan, I do rather doubt the verity of that advice. I suspect it may be what we often refer to as as "urban legend" or "old wives' tale". True annuals are just that, and there is no way to make them perennials. The same goes for perennials -- unless one is growing them in unfavorable conditons. (For example, tuberous begonias are perennials. However, in my climate, they are annuals unless one digs the tubers up in the fall and stores them appropriately. They simply cannot survive our winters.) Now that said there are also short-lived perennials like columbine that often die out after a few years. For that reason it is a good idea with such to allow some reseeding.

  5. #15
    Teena's Avatar
    Teena is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Martha
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    can't choose
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    No. of Boston, MA USA
    Posts
    578
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    There's a fellow who lives not far from me who has a very healthy fig tree in his yard. Sometime in early October every year he prunes it and wraps it in many layers of bubble wrap until it resembles a giant bubble wrapped missile type sculpture about 4 feet around. It must work because sometime in the spring he unwraps it and the tree springs back to life and rewards him with many figs. Figs are not native to this climate, way too delicate for our winter weather. - martha

  6. #16
    Hoanui is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    152
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    We had it down to -15C for the past two winters and I had ONE fig this year - that was until the foot of snow slid off my roof and broke the part with the fig! LMAO

  7. #17
    Teena's Avatar
    Teena is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Martha
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    can't choose
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    No. of Boston, MA USA
    Posts
    578
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Yes it will get that cold in Boston, artic express from Canada when the jet stream is just right. Only a foot of snow slid off your roof, that's not a lot of snow. This is last winter taken out the bedroom window so the roof is still 2 feet down from the bottom of the photo.

    Name:  roofsnow.jpg
Views: 80
Size:  76.1 KB

  8. #18
    Hoanui is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    152
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    We used to get season here and we got some snow in winter but never very much. Sometimes we got enough snow to block roads and cover buses. The past two winters have been well below freezing for months on end and there were satellite pics of the UK totally covered by the stuff. We normally just get a light dusting, but my ONLY FIG!!!!!!! LOL I was soo looking forward to eating it. did I say earlier that my variety was called Brown Turkey??? It's probably the easiest to grow in my local climate.

  9. #19
    Hoanui is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    152
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pavel View Post
    The fact the poppies are "spreading like mad" goes to show that you don't have to cut the first years flowers off.

    Jordan, I do rather doubt the verity of that advice. I suspect it may be what we often refer to as as "urban legend" or "old wives' tale". True annuals are just that, and there is no way to make them perennials. The same goes for perennials -- unless one is growing them in unfavorable conditons. (For example, tuberous begonias are perennials. However, in my climate, they are annuals unless one digs the tubers up in the fall and stores them appropriately. They simply cannot survive our winters.) Now that said there are also short-lived perennials like columbine that often die out after a few years. For that reason it is a good idea with such to allow some reseeding.
    I was wondering the same thing. My poppies produce new plants from their bases - that or a seed has landed really close to the base and grown from there. this year there was a white one - a colour I hadn't planted so I'm not too sure of what's going on there. Part of the blue breeding perhaps?

    My two eucalyptus trees grew like they were going out of style. They were two feet all when planted four years ago or so and now they're well over twelve feet tall.

  10. #20
    pavel's Avatar
    pavel is offline change is the only constant
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    whatever will bloom
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,643
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoanui View Post
    My poppies produce new plants from their bases - that or a seed has landed really close to the base and grown from there. this year there was a white one - a colour I hadn't planted so I'm not too sure of what's going on there. Part of the blue breeding perhaps?

    It's possible that a seed landed there that is now expressing recessive traits or a mutation. If the white is one sprouting from the base of an older plant, it may be what is referred to as a "sport". This would be the result of a mutation.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Dessert Frozen Lemon Cream
    By Ron-NY in forum The 'NEW' Kitchen - off the Outback Terrace Bar
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: March 2nd, 2013, 12:08 PM
  2. Beverage Frozen Hot Chocolate
    By ang709 in forum The 'NEW' Kitchen - off the Outback Terrace Bar
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 12th, 2009, 09:12 PM
  3. Frozen Phal--HELP!
    By sadie in forum Orchid Ailments / The Compost Pile
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 11th, 2007, 08:57 AM
  4. Hell hath frozen over.....
    By Cinderella in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: November 21st, 2005, 08:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.