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Cattleya with no roots - Sphag and bag or what?

This is a discussion on Cattleya with no roots - Sphag and bag or what? within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; I rescued (maybe) a Blc. Memoria Anna Balmorea 'Convex' from a BBS. I'm just not ...

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  1. #1
    GenevaDad's Avatar
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    Default Cattleya with no roots - Sphag and bag or what?

    I rescued (maybe) a Blc. Memoria Anna Balmorea 'Convex' from a BBS. I'm just not sure how to proceed. Root hormone? Pot it? Sphag and Bag? Hydrogen Peroxide Physan 20? I've done a lot of reading, but with so many options I'm confused which way to go.

    Suggestions and opinions would be greatly appreciated.

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  2. #2
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    Default Catt with no roots - Sphag and bag or what? #2

    This is another Catt I rescued. All the roots were rotted so I cleaned it up. Same questions as my prior post. The leaf turned yellow in three days.

    Thanks

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    Bob- I am not experienced enough to give advice on this because in your position I too would be asking for advice... But I wish you every success. Do keep us posted with news af your progress! Cheers

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    you're not alone Bob,i'm the one who faced this situation but at least you're not the killer like me.now i try many things with my sick Catts.(i have about 13 to try) be careful for the spag and bag,you need to open the bag time to time if not you're going to bake it.anyway hope somebody can give you some advise.good luck

    editing : here's some answer from my thread http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...a-orchids.html
    Last edited by k_andreev; January 17th, 2012 at 03:19 PM.

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    Bob, the key to recoving rootless orchids is to raise the humidity, so the plant doesn't transpire moisture from the leaves faster than it can recover roots, while preventing rot from taking advantage of the plant.

    I have not had great success with sphag & bag. It is a great way to contain humidity, but the problem I have is getting enough airflow in the bag to keep out rot.

    I had some good luck just sticking the bare plant in empty, sterilized clay pots in low light and waiting to pot them up until they began to shoot out roots. But I work hard to keep the humidity in my growing area above 50% in the winter so it took alot of tinkering to keep the humidity high enough this way. If I had a greenhouse this would be my preferred method.

    This is what works best for me: Treat the underlying problem. A dip in physan is a good general preventative, unless you have a serious rot going on. I have seen someone recommend a 10% bleach solution (Cathy Day? Betty? I forget who uses bleach) and I hope to try that, but I haven't root-rotted anything for a while. Then I give the plant a brief soak in tepid water with 1 tsp sugar, 1 tsp vodka and my secret weapon, 1 Tbs Seaweed Extract. Let it drip-dry upside down briefly and then pot it up.

    I do something similar to your picture on #2, only I stake and tie it as immobile as possible with the rhizome just above the media. It is easy to put a hole in the side of those pots with a self-tapping screw, then you can thread a plastic coated wire through to suspend the plant and tie a stake securely to the pot. If you rely on tucking the rhizome into the media to stabilize the plant, it can easily cause more rot. Here is a recovering dendrobium. It has fairly good roots on the new growth, so I could probably take down its support structure.
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    Then the key is keeping the humidity high around it. I put the pot back in a humidity tray in a shady spot and water the media with the rest of the herd. I have toyed with daily misting and loosely bagging over top the pot. . .do what works best for you to find a balance between too dry and rot.I do a foliar feed with seaweed every 3-4 weeks and wait. Sometimes they begin popping new roots within the week, sometimes a month or two. The longest it took for one to begin new growth was 8 months. Your first pic has a nice new growth and great eyes, it should take off soon. Good luck.

    ETA: Looking at your pic again, I see that first catt, especially, has one of those upright climbing rhizomes. Annoying for these purposes. I would put a little bark in the pot and then stake that oldest growth low in the pot upright vertical against the side. Then tuck some bark in a little slope underneath the rest so the new growth and eyes will be close to the humidity the bark gives off. Maybe a stake for the newest mature pb, if it seems a little loose. The only other option is a pot way too big with your leaves kilting off to the side at a funny angle. Unless you want to mount it and try to keep the humidity up?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kassie View Post
    I had some good luck just sticking the bare plant in empty, sterilized clay pots in low light and waiting to pot them up until they began to shoot out roots. But I work hard to keep the humidity in my growing area above 50% in the winter so it took alot of tinkering to keep the humidity high enough this way. If I had a greenhouse this would be my preferred method.
    I've tried this with some success, only I put an overturned baggie or storage bag over them (not sealed tightly, just placed over it to make a tent) on top.

  7. #7
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    I lay rootless Catts. on a wire shelf in the greenhouse semi shaded until they start roots then I pot it not much use potting if they can't eat or drink ..

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    Gin, do you have an automatic misting system? I plan on doing something similar someday, when (IF, ha!) I get a greenhouse. Indoors in the winter with the furnace running full blast, I find it too difficult to supply adequate humidity to a bare root plant.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kassie View Post
    Bob, the key to recoving rootless orchids is to raise the humidity, so the plant doesn't transpire moisture from the leaves faster than it can recover roots, while preventing rot from taking advantage of the plant.

    I have not had great success with sphag & bag. It is a great way to contain humidity, but the problem I have is getting enough airflow in the bag to keep out rot.

    I had some good luck just sticking the bare plant in empty, sterilized clay pots in low light and waiting to pot them up until they began to shoot out roots. But I work hard to keep the humidity in my growing area above 50% in the winter so it took alot of tinkering to keep the humidity high enough this way. If I had a greenhouse this would be my preferred method.

    This is what works best for me: Treat the underlying problem. A dip in physan is a good general preventative, unless you have a serious rot going on. I have seen someone recommend a 10% bleach solution (Cathy Day? Betty? I forget who uses bleach) and I hope to try that, but I haven't root-rotted anything for a while. Then I give the plant a brief soak in tepid water with 1 tsp sugar, 1 tsp vodka and my secret weapon, 1 Tbs Seaweed Extract. Let it drip-dry upside down briefly and then pot it up.

    I do something similar to your picture on #2, only I stake and tie it as immobile as possible with the rhizome just above the media. It is easy to put a hole in the side of those pots with a self-tapping screw, then you can thread a plastic coated wire through to suspend the plant and tie a stake securely to the pot. If you rely on tucking the rhizome into the media to stabilize the plant, it can easily cause more rot. Here is a recovering dendrobium. It has fairly good roots on the new growth, so I could probably take down its support structure.
    Name:  DSCF1546 (479x640).jpg
Views: 1830
Size:  241.3 KBName:  DSCF1547 (479x640).jpg
Views: 2174
Size:  236.5 KB

    Then the key is keeping the humidity high around it. I put the pot back in a humidity tray in a shady spot and water the media with the rest of the herd. I have toyed with daily misting and loosely bagging over top the pot. . .do what works best for you to find a balance between too dry and rot.I do a foliar feed with seaweed every 3-4 weeks and wait. Sometimes they begin popping new roots within the week, sometimes a month or two. The longest it took for one to begin new growth was 8 months. Your first pic has a nice new growth and great eyes, it should take off soon. Good luck.

    ETA: Looking at your pic again, I see that first catt, especially, has one of those upright climbing rhizomes. Annoying for these purposes. I would put a little bark in the pot and then stake that oldest growth low in the pot upright vertical against the side. Then tuck some bark in a little slope underneath the rest so the new growth and eyes will be close to the humidity the bark gives off. Maybe a stake for the newest mature pb, if it seems a little loose. The only other option is a pot way too big with your leaves kilting off to the side at a funny angle. Unless you want to mount it and try to keep the humidity up?
    Thank you Cassie for all the valuable information. I'll take pics and let you take a look.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gin View Post
    I lay rootless Catts. on a wire shelf in the greenhouse semi shaded until they start roots then I pot it not much use potting if they can't eat or drink ..
    You mean literally you just keep them in a high RH and just wait for roots?!

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