Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Like Tree6Likes

one leaf or two on catt hybrids

This is a discussion on one leaf or two on catt hybrids within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; I have a Blc. Rustic Spots which I love not only for the flowers and ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    sciencegal's Avatar
    sciencegal is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Karin
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    701

    Default one leaf or two on catt hybrids

    I have a Blc. Rustic Spots which I love not only for the flowers and the fact that it is growing well for me but I love the foliage. I like the long thin pb with the one leaf. It looks like a succulent. I would like it even if it didn't bloom.

    So, I thought I would look for more Blc's but I notice that the ones posted here recently have two leaves per pb. I remember reading somewhere about the the one vs two leaves on catt hybrids. Why do some have one and others have two? And if I want to find more single leaved ones what should I look for?

  2. #2
    Chris in Hamilton's Avatar
    Chris in Hamilton is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Dendrobium, Cattleya
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,053
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    In answer to the 1st question its just a matter of the cross. If a bifoliate is used you stand a better chance of getting a bifoliate plant. The more of those involved in the hybrid the better your odds. Brassavola dominate plants are more likely to be unifoliate. At least I think that's how it works. Best way to find them is to look at the plant. I have a few that jump back and forth.

  3. #3
    78Terp's Avatar
    78Terp is offline An Avant Gardner
    Real Name
    Harvey
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    1-Neo falcata,2-Phal,3-Paph
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    6,036
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I agree with Chris' perspective on the question.

  4. #4
    sciencegal's Avatar
    sciencegal is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Karin
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    701

    Default

    So, a Blc hybrid isn't necessarily Brassavola dominant?

  5. #5
    78Terp's Avatar
    78Terp is offline An Avant Gardner
    Real Name
    Harvey
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    1-Neo falcata,2-Phal,3-Paph
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Littleton, Colorado
    Posts
    6,036
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I would say no. But I really don't know.

  6. #6
    Chris in Hamilton's Avatar
    Chris in Hamilton is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Dendrobium, Cattleya
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,053
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I'm not sure how it works Karin. Folks that have experience with hybridizing are going to have to give some input. I do know that just about any plant I see that I like, and is Brassavola dominate is unifoliate and has kick ass flowers.
    Last edited by Chris in Hamilton; June 29th, 2016 at 01:47 PM. Reason: Corrected

  7. #7
    sciencegal's Avatar
    sciencegal is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Karin
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    701

    Default

    I've found a list of Cattleya species that are unifoliate. I wonder if all of the Richard Mueller crosses are unifoliate and similar to Rustic spots?
    Posted via Mobile Device

  8. #8
    raybark's Avatar
    raybark is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Ray Barkalow
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Oak Island NC
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sciencegal View Post
    So, a Blc hybrid isn't necessarily Brassavola dominant?
    Nope, not necessarily. If it has ANY Brassavola in it, it's a brasso-X. If you have a B x C, and cross it with a C, it's still a Bc. Cross it again with a C, and yes, still a Bc. Cross each subsequent offspring with another C a million times, and even though, statistically, there might be no B genes left in the offspring, it's still considered to be a Bc.

    Until the day comes that we are capable of genetically mapping all plants and that allows distinctions, it's gonna stay that way.

  9. #9
    leafmite's Avatar
    leafmite is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Leaf Mite
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    anything fragrant, miniatures
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    244
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    There are quite a few species Cattleyas with just one leaf per pseudobulb. You shouldn't have much difficulty finding more.

  10. #10
    Bohata is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    23

    Default

    The Brassavolas all tend to have one leaf per. I think most Laileas do the same. So it depends how much Cattleya influence you have and which ones. Also, the bifoliate character tends to be partially dominant. So if you cross a BL. with Cattleya Aclandia, about half of the pseudobulbs will have one leaf, the other half two. But watch out with young seedlings, which are probably always unifoliate at first. At least, this is my experience with Cattleya violacea.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Phal species, primary hybrids, complex hybrids in bloom
    By EquestrisFan in forum Phalaenopsis, Oncidium, & Intergenerics IN BLOOM
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: October 8th, 2013, 06:42 PM
  2. black spots on catt leaf
    By brit6v in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 26th, 2013, 06:14 PM
  3. Black Leaf on new Catt
    By kjones1957 in forum Orchid Ailments / The Compost Pile
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: July 27th, 2010, 05:05 PM
  4. help, large catt makes sheaths that turn into leaf
    By orchidfloosy in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: December 16th, 2008, 04:47 PM
  5. Catt leaf tip trouble - help?
    By Kellygreen in forum Orchid Ailments / The Compost Pile
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: June 19th, 2007, 10:53 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.