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Vanda Help

This is a discussion on Vanda Help within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; ewbie there are as many fertilizers as there are growers ,as all growers will end ...

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  1. #11
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    ewbie
    there are as many fertilizers as there are growers ,as all growers will end up using something different.
    Here in new zealand the fertilzers are labeled different to where you are,we have the actual N,P,K, rating expressed as a percentage.Under my conditions I have two fertilizers that I use,one for growing and the other for flowering.Generally the growing fert is a high nitrogen and the flowering has lower nitrogen and higher Potastassium.
    So I am using a (as percentage.27/5.5/9 for growth at 1/4 strenght 1-2 times per week and 15/4/26 about 2-3 times per 14 days)I have found ,for me that in the growing season if I stay with the high nitrogen fert ,the plants are way to lush.

    Having Dendrobs and Vandas is no problem , as both have a growing and flowering season.
    The Dendrobs will grow and flower while at rest,and at this time there is very little growth and therefore will not need feeding.
    The Vandas on the other hand grow all year and can flower at any time,therefore a fert lower in nitrogen would be better as they are feed all year round.
    As for feeding young plants a high nitrgen fert , that is to get the growth as they are not going to flower.Not seeing a difference in the vanda since you have been feeding it the high nitrogen would not be uncommon due to the fact that the vanda does not have to grow as much to flower again,and is also aslower growing(imagin a vanda growing the equivilent to a cane of the Dendrob).

    By the way the Dendrobs that you will be growing will be HARD CANE ,and they are covered under this thread
    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...splay.php?f=60

  2. #12
    ewbie is offline Member
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    wow! thanks so much for such simple and yet detailed explanation there.

    please explain the growing season and flowering season. does it mean we follow the calendar for their growing and flowering season or we follow how the plant looks like? with such a novice like me i don't know when a young plant has matured once it reach the same height as the old canes. my dendrob has produced young ones so normally how many months does it take to mature?

    thanks. is it okay to continue my questions here or should i PM you instead?

  3. #13
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    The best way to describe the growing and flowering seasons is to follow the plant's behaviour.But normally the plants grow in the warmer,more miost/humid
    time of year,but there are exceptions to the rule.
    If we take the Dendrob and look at it as a hard cane (flower spikes out the top of the canes).They come from an enviroment where there is tropical rain
    6 months of the year and hot and dry for the other 6 months.
    Generally the plant grows during the rainny season and flowers in the dry,with the bulbs/canes susstaning the plant over those dry months.
    The Vanda on the other hand comes from an enviroment that is hot and humid all year round,and therefore does not need the bulbs to sustant it.Vandas can flower at anytime of the year just like the Phalies to which they are related, if distantly.Therefore the Vanda has a time clock of its own and can be out of sink with other plants.

  4. #14
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    thanks for the explanation. that would be easier for me since we only have 2 seasons here, the dry and the rainy.
    thanks so much.

  5. #15
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    i have another question about watering and misting.
    i always read orchids specially dendrob would like the roots to get dry. so applying water 2-3x a week if dry and once a week during cooler season. i followed it during summer but my plants got infested with red mites. then i read somewhere in this forum about misting but not clearly explained.
    so what do we do in between waterings? just leave the plants alone or do we mist them? how about during wet season? does misting applies also? btw, my dendrobs are under the roof so they don't get wet on the rain.
    thanks in advance

  6. #16
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    it sounds like you are able to grow the dendrobs outside in all weather.
    This link http://www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/qld.emblem.html
    is to the state flower of Queesland Austrailia as I feel that it gives good info on this species and it is used in breeding the hard cane dendrobs like you grow.

    When misting ,mist the whole plant not just the roots as if that red mite is the same as we get here ,it is an indication that the humidity is not high enough (they dislike water).
    During the dry season there is now water and humidity could be quite low.BTW in the natural habitat from about the 1/2 way point in the dry season these plants can be subjected to bush fires.In the wet season it is quite common for a tropical down pour everyday in the mid to late afternoon.

    I found this artical and it may also help

    Dendrobium bigibbum (Lindley 1852 ) by Len Field

    Common name of Cooktown orchid.

    This species was first named by Lindley in 1852 and since then has had over 40 name changes but these have now been reduced to just two in recent times by Clements who has reduced all synonyms to just three species Dendrobium bigibbum is one and sub variety compactum is now known as Dendrobium liphocola (growing on rocks) with D.phalaenopsis the third.This may reduce some confusion but can also lead to more confusion especially when one considers the many hybrids that have these species as one of the parents,so I will continue to refer to them by the names of Dendrobium bigibbum var.bigibbum , Dendrobium bigibbum var. superbum and the sub variety compactum.

    (Editor - the new names are gaining recognition. It would be best to use the new names as the differences warrent species rank.)

    While looking through old bulletins I came across the following article which I will reproduce here The name Dendrobium bigibbum was given to the species in 1852 by Lindley for a plant that had been collected on Mt Adolphus Island which lies about 18 kilometres north of Cape York. To confuse the issue , in 1880 Fitzgerald described a plant growing in the garden of a Captain Bloomfield at Balmain, Sydney and named it Dendrobium phalaenopsis this plant was reported as coming from Cairns. However, botanists to-day are convinced that no such plant fitting Fitzgeralds description has originated in Australia Fitzgeralds description better fits plants from Larat, An island in the Timor Laut group in Indonesia.This was further confused by a collector by the name of Micholit, who, to hide the true location had given North New Guinea as the location of plants fitting Fitzgeralds description that were sent to Sander by him, and apparently also came from Larat, as did plants collected by H.O.Forbes who was more honest about the location of collection. Most of Forbes plants finished in the collection of Baron Schroeder and became known as Dendrobium schroederianum.

    In 1964 S.T.Blake, a Queensland botanist, successfully sorted out the identification of Queenslands floral emblem the "Cooktown orchid". His paper was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland 1964, and a condensed version can be found in the Australian Orchid Revue, March 1966. As many as forty names have been given to Dendrobium bigibbum and its variations. However, it is now considered there are only two valid varieties, one with two sub varieties.

    Dendrobium bigibbum var bigibbum

    Occurs on Cape York Peninsular from the Archer River northward and extends to the Torres Strait Islands, preferring slender trees in dry scrub areas. the flowers of this variety are usually smaller than the next variety and usually have a white crest on the labellum.

    Dendrobium bigibbum var. superbum

    Has two sub-varieties. Subvariety superbum is the one considered to be the "Cooktown orchid"and is found from the Archer River south to Mt. Molloy, and grows under similar conditions to Dendrobium var. bigibbum

    Dendrobium bigibbum subvariety compactum is apparently confined to the Macalister Range between the Barron and Mossman Rivers, and grows on rocks quite often exposed to the sun. It differs from the others in its short robust stems. All varieties are usually autumn bloomers. The above extract was taken from An article written for A.N.O.S Newcastle Group March 1977 by George Hillman. When Dendrobium bigibbum was made the floral emblem of Queensland in 1964 it caused great controversy as coming from one localized area many thought it did not truly represent the state also it almost led to its extinction in the wild due to extensive collecting. I can always remember the only time I went looking for Dendrobium bigibbum for having been told where I could find sub variety compactum I decided to make a solo expedition to find it and after walking for klms across reasonably flat country covered in Ti tree where I found one very small plant on a rock face overlooking a gully but while trying to get a closer look I made the mistake of climbing a small tree and was immediately covered in green ants which was not a very pleasant experience. After that I lost most of my enthusiasm for looking for this species. Flowering can take place from January through to November but is usually in the Autumn months. Flowers can range in colour from white (rare) through to deep purple with 3 to 15 on peduncles 15-20 cm long and can vary greatly in size but usually about 3 to 5 cm in diameter. Many beautiful hybrids both natural and man made with this species as one of the parents have been made with one Dendrobium x. superbiens (Dendrobium bigibbum x Dendrobium discolor coming to mind as one of the better known natural crosses.

    Cultivation Some warmth may be needed in the colder areas but I have found that D. sub variety compactum does seem to be more cold tolerant, this no doubt is due to there lithophytic nature. Years ago it was unusual to find anyone growing any of these species in pots ,usually it was tied to a tree fern slab or a piece of hardwood etc, but now the better grown plants seem to be found growing in pots with a well drained compost. This can be partly due to the fact that many of these plants have Sub variety compactum in there ancestry and being lithophytic adapt better to this environment. As a point of interest a lot of growers are now growing many types of species in pots which years ago was unheard off for instance Dendrobium tetrogonum to name one. Watering is also very important while they need a good supply in our summer months a good way to ruin a plant is to water in the winter remember they come from a tropical area where the winters are very dry.

  7. #17
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    it's the type that i have. got it last july with bloom then some i repotted it on march. april, it got infested with the mites and the leaves are almost gone. huhuhu i'm so sad and disappointed coz when i pass by a house near mine, their's just keep on shooting flowers! my househelp ask them what kind of fertilizer they use and replied they just water it everyday! as in super wet! is there such thing as green thumb? don't i have them? i know, caring for orchids is easy but bringing them to bloom is another thing.

  8. #18
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    The last comment you made can be very true,at times it can be easy to groe plants but to flower them is another story.It is possible to grow a plant and not flower it if the conditions premote growth,then the plant will not flower.
    you might find this link help full as well .It gives temp,rain and all sorts of info



    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...ead.php?t=4583


  9. #19
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    well, since am not growing it for a year or two, i guess i just have to wait and follow what you have taught me about fertilizer and watering. at least i found hope when there's a difference after applying the hi-nitro fertilizer. and the experience with the red mites after this summer, my plants won't get them next year. oooh, so much things to learn but too slow if to rely on day to day experience or seasonal basis.

  10. #20
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    btw, thank you very much for helping me understand my plants. and the links you forward to me are very informative.

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