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Vandas in New England

This is a discussion on Vandas in New England within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; ...

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  1. #1
    Silvix is offline Junior Member
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    Default Vandas in New England

    Hi all,
    Recently a friend of mine who lives in California told me she was going to send me an orchid seedling, I assumed it was going to be a dendrobium because she has one with lots of keikis. To my surprise, yesterday I received a Vanda seedling! They are beautiful for sure, but Iím not sure how to take care of her in the Boston weather, specially during the fall and winter months. Iíve been reading and found something about semi hydroponics, but I donít know if that really might work.
    Can you give me some advice, please?
    Posted via Mobile Device

  2. #2
    Arne's Avatar
    Arne is offline Senior Member
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    What kind of Vanda is it?

    There are many Vandas that are manageable also in Massachusetts, at least if you are used to orchids in general.

  3. #3
    Silvix is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Arne.
    I donít know what kind of Vanda it is, it has no ID and my friend doesnít know either.
    Iím used to orchids, I have dendrobiums, oncidiums and cattleyas, but this is my first Vanda, so Iím not so sure about this one. Any advice would be really appreciated.
    What kinds of Vandas do you think do well in Massachusetts?
    Thanks in advance,
    Silvia.
    Posted via Mobile Device

  4. #4
    Arne's Avatar
    Arne is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silvix View Post
    Hi Arne.
    I don’t know what kind of Vanda it is, it has no ID and my friend doesn’t know either.
    I’m used to orchids, I have dendrobiums, oncidiums and cattleyas, but this is my first Vanda, so I’m not so sure about this one. Any advice would be really appreciated.
    What kinds of Vandas do you think do well in Massachusetts?
    Thanks in advance,
    Silvia.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    If you can provide enough light for Cattleya you should be able to also have those Vanda that accept intermediate temperatures and are forgiving of somewhat lower humidity. The easiest of those are Ascofinetia hybrids for instance (Neofinetia falcata as a parent). Other Vandas that like cooler temperatures are those with V. cristata in the background, e.g. Vanda Paki. V. cristata is easy to grow here in Baltimore. If your friend grew this Vanda successfully in California it should tolerate intermediate temperatures. A friend of mine in California grows both V. cristata and Paki successfully. V. coerulea likes cooler temperatures as well but I have no experience with this one.

  5. #5
    Silvix is offline Junior Member
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    Arnie,
    Thanks for your advice, Iíll give them plenty of light the following months and I have lamps to provide light on the short days of the fall and winter.
    😃
    Posted via Mobile Device

  6. #6
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    raybark is offline Senior Member
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    Default

    Vandas in semi-hydroponics is a very hit-or-miss situation, with success or failure being determined primarily by the temperature you keep it in. Personally, up in Boston, I'd go with a coarse bark medium. Keep it warm.

  7. #7
    Arne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raybark View Post
    Vandas in semi-hydroponics is a very hit-or-miss situation, with success or failure being determined primarily by the temperature you keep it in. Personally, up in Boston, I'd go with a coarse bark medium. Keep it warm.
    I agree with Ray. That's the only way I do it where I live.

  8. #8
    Silvix is offline Junior Member
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    thanks for your advice, I will follow it.

    ---------- Post Merged at 12:15 PM ----------

    Thank you! I'll give it a try!

  9. #9
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    I did grow the big strap-leaved Vandas in true hydroponics - flood and drain for a while, very successfully in terms of how well they grew ; from memory, more than 50% double spiked, and I got great flower counts too. But no compost would stay in the pots, it all got flushed away, and the roots grew into a tangle and went right across the tank - and I don't means those stringy grey hanging roots you see on plants newly imported from Bangkok, I mean ones up to a cm thick growing straight out sideways and branching everywhere. So the only way I could take a plant to a show was by starting out with a pair of bolt cutters or very strong secateurs, and cutting the plant out from the jungle - which of course was a major set-back when it came back.
    I have been pondering how to solve that one for years ( of course I gave it up after only one year) and maybe have the answer - I just need to find a few square feet of bench free, to set it up and try again.
    Btw I used to measure the growth rate by measuring how many inches of new leaf growth I got each month - the best were growing more than 10 inches - which amounts to several pairs of leaves a year.on each plant . I have some pictures , but neither time nor space to put them up here.

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