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Phals with 2 spike as 1st bloom are genetically stronger?

This is a discussion on Phals with 2 spike as 1st bloom are genetically stronger? within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; Hi all, I went to a nursery with alot of phals that was grow from ...

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  1. #1
    KC Kam is offline Senior Member
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    Default Phals with 2 spike as 1st bloom are genetically stronger?

    Hi all,

    I went to a nursery with alot of phals that was grow from seedlings. They group them by species. I was looking though them, they are of the same batch. Some with 1 spike and some with 2 spikes. Then i recalled that i bought a p. bellina few years ago. It was with 2 blooms when i bought it and whenever blooming season comes i realise that after the 1st bloom opened, the 2nd bloom comes after 2 weeks and subsequently i will get 2 blooms all the way till the season ends. Thats when these questions come to my mind :

    Are phals with 2 spike as 1st bloom are genetically stronger compare to those with only 1 spike?

    Under same care and environment, do they always have more spikes compare to usual ones?

    Any insight on this?

    Thank you all

  2. #2
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    raybark is online now Senior Member
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    It's all about the plant's ability to stockpile reserves of food and fuel. A seedling that is that prolific is likely better able to do so than it's siblings, but that is in those particular conditions. Change those conditions and it may-, or may not repeat that, and other plants might even do better.

    As mentioned in the linked article above, there are chemical processes that build stores and those that use them. Under certain conditions, the former beat out the latter and the plant can "think about sex". Under conditions that don't strongly favor the former, survival is more important.

    I have a friend in Costa Rica that held a bunch of phalaenopsis >80°F for a couple of years. They grew beautifully, reaching 10-12 pairs of huge leaves each, but not a hint of blooming. After spending a few weeks at about 65°-70° to initiate spiking, they had built up enough reserves that each threw over a dozen spikes.

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    As Ray said, it's all about food and fuel - how ready the plant is at the point that something triggers spike development. But even in a batch that has been grown together since deflasking that doesn't necessary mean the genetically gifted ones necessary get more spikes. Even in a bench of clones some will out-perform others. Perhaps some were bigger coming out of flask, some got a little less sun or water or fertilizer because of position, a few had to fight off a pathogen. Some may be genetically predisposed to get 2 weak spikes instead of 1 strong one given the same resources, while others tend to get a single (potentially huge) spike no matter how strong. Of course, when you're picking 1 plant off the bench to buy you go for the big healthy one with 2 good spikes, but even then it may be a great performer in ideal greenhouse conditions but not the best choice for your windowsill. When you observe a plant through several seasons and it always performs better for you then the genetics do match your conditions better than others, but that first bloom seedling isn't necessarily a predictor of that.

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    KC Kam is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by raybark View Post
    It's all about the plant's ability to stockpile reserves of food and fuel. A seedling that is that prolific is likely better able to do so than it's siblings, but that is in those particular conditions. Change those conditions and it may-, or may not repeat that, and other plants might even do better.

    As mentioned in the linked article above, there are chemical processes that build stores and those that use them. Under certain conditions, the former beat out the latter and the plant can "think about sex". Under conditions that don't strongly favor the former, survival is more important.

    I have a friend in Costa Rica that held a bunch of phalaenopsis >80°F for a couple of years. They grew beautifully, reaching 10-12 pairs of huge leaves each, but not a hint of blooming. After spending a few weeks at about 65°-70° to initiate spiking, they had built up enough reserves that each threw over a dozen spikes.
    Thanks Ray!

    ---------- Post Merged at 10:16 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by PaphMadMan View Post
    As Ray said, it's all about food and fuel - how ready the plant is at the point that something triggers spike development. But even in a batch that has been grown together since deflasking that doesn't necessary mean the genetically gifted ones necessary get more spikes. Even in a bench of clones some will out-perform others. Perhaps some were bigger coming out of flask, some got a little less sun or water or fertilizer because of position, a few had to fight off a pathogen. Some may be genetically predisposed to get 2 weak spikes instead of 1 strong one given the same resources, while others tend to get a single (potentially huge) spike no matter how strong. Of course, when you're picking 1 plant off the bench to buy you go for the big healthy one with 2 good spikes, but even then it may be a great performer in ideal greenhouse conditions but not the best choice for your windowsill. When you observe a plant through several seasons and it always performs better for you then the genetics do match your conditions better than others, but that first bloom seedling isn't necessarily a predictor of that.
    Thanks Kirk!

    ---------- Post Merged at 10:18 AM ----------

    Which means it is depending on luck as well because i wont know how it will grow in my home? In that case i can choose anyone as long as it has healthy leaves (for monopodial) and pseudobuld / bulb?
    Last edited by KC Kam; October 31st, 2019 at 01:39 AM.

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    When buying seedlings, I always look for the standouts. It doesn't guarantee that they'll continue performing better, but it says they can. After that, it's up to me to provide the care it needs to do so.

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    KC Kam is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by raybark View Post
    When buying seedlings, I always look for the standouts. It doesn't guarantee that they'll continue performing better, but it says they can. After that, it's up to me to provide the care it needs to do so.
    Noted. Thanks Ray!

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