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Bugs Bugs and more Bugs !

This is a discussion on Bugs Bugs and more Bugs ! within the New Growers: Ask the Senior Members forums, part of the New Growers category; I found this Info. on scale on the web thought it might be helpful . ...

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  1. #1
    Gin's Avatar
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    Angry Bugs Bugs and more Bugs !

    I found this Info. on scale on the web thought it might be helpful . I have more on other types of pests will wait to see if the new growers are interested .

    There are many types of Orchid pests.
    INSECT PESTS:
    Scale InsectsCoccoidea) Scale insects are serious pests of orchids. They are so different from the usual concept of insects that they are frequently mistaken for fungal growths. Scale insects are generally tiny inconspicuous animals that can be so numerous that they can cover the plants. They feed by means of their long stylets or mouthparts, causing the development of chlorotic arears wherever extraction of sap has occured. Heavily infested plants appear unhealthy, and frequently symptoms are more obvious than the scale insects themselves. The presence of ants on the plants may be an indication that a soft scale or mealybug infestation is present. Ants visit plants in search of honeydew, a sweetish liquid excreted by some scale insects. Honeydew is an excellent medium for sooty mold. Thus plants with ants and sooty mold on the leaves should be examined carefully for soft scale and/or mealybugs.

    Armored ScalesDiaspididae) Armored scales are found on the leaf, rhizome or pseudobulbs. Their presence may be indicated by a yellowish discoloration of the leaves. Armored scales do not excrete honeydew. These insects secrete a waxy, hardened covering that is not part of the insects body. The armor is nonliving and composed of secreted waxes incorporated with nymphal cast skins. This protective covering may be circular, semi-circular, oblong, or pear shaped.

    Boisduval ScaleDiaspis boisduvalii) The males of this scecies usually clusted together and give the appearance of a cottony mass on the leaf.
    Florida Red ScaleChrysomphalus aonidum) The armor is usually reddish brown to almost black and the margin is somewhat ash gray.

    Proteus ScaleParlatoria proteus) The armor is usually slightly convex and a brownish or greenish yellow with lighter margins.

    Red Orchid ScaleFurcaspis biformis) The armor is usually circular, convex, dark reddish brown. Red Orchid scale is similar to Florida Red Scale, but the armor texture is much coarser in the former.

    Vanda Orchid ScaleGenaparlatoria pseudaspidiotus) The armor is usually oval, convex, and dark brown, and is usually covered with a thin, waxy or dusty secretion.

    Soft Scales:Coccidae) Soft scales are found on the leaf, rhizome or pseudobulbsThe soft scales do not have a detached protective armor like the hard scales. The body may be exposed or covered by soft wax, dull or glassy, clear or opaque, translucent or netlike, and variable in size and shape.

    Brown Soft ScaleCoccus hesperidum) The armor is usually oval, flat to slightly convex. The color is usually a yellowish green or yellowish brown, ofter flecked with brown spots. Large quanities of honeydew are excreted.
    Stellate ScaleVinsonia stellifera) This soft scale is star-shaped and soft bodied, resembling a miniture starfish. The convex, waxy, protective cover is glassy and semi-transparent. The rays become flattened at their extremes. They are usually pink to purplish red and darkens with age to a reddish brown. Gin

  2. #2
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    Thanks Gin, thats very usefull. Believe it or not, that post was better than some books I have.

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    Yuk! Good post, Gin! But I hate them all! I HATE scale! I really do. I haven't had (thank god) the panzer type Mehera showed (although I've seen them on others' plants), but I have gotten one on one occassion that exuded a red liquid, as if the plant were bleeding. That totally whigged me out and I brought my nuclear arsensal out to meet the threat. (It worked, but I was in therapy for months!)

    Julie

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    Ewwww! not seen that kind , Systemics Rock !

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    Well that's certainly informative. Some years back I had a major infestation of what was probably the soft brown type--copious amounts of honeydew; that was what caused you to notice it. It was encrusted all over my houseplants like jade plant and aloe vera. Had small kids at the time, and probably wasn't very vigilant!

    Anyway, I thought they all looked like that. But this pest has many faces. Yuck--I'm feeling itchy all over just thinking about it.

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    Great info! I think I had at at least tree kinds on my plants. I most hate the ones that affect leaves and roots. Spraying is a big problem for me because I have small children and pets. Instead insecticides, I have been spraying my plants every week with mix of rubbing alcohol and soap, and it seems to keep them bug free so far.

    A

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    Consider neem oil, if you're looking for a non-toxic bug treatment. You can get it at orchid suppliers and some garden centers. It's natural, coming from the neem tree, and kills the little buggers in a diluted spray that you make up. (I think the oil suffocates them.) It has a bit of a funky smell, but that fades quickly, and I've come to actually like it.

    PM me if you'd like an on-line source.

    Julie

  8. #8
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    MitesAcari) The presence of mites can be determined by rubbing a white cloth over a suspected area. If mites and eggs are present, brownish / orange streaks will be seen on the cloth.
    Control usually entails purchasing an insecticide especially suited for dealing with mites.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    These are awful , they do a lot of damage before being noticed . Some do not make webs ,known as false spider mites , They are bad on Phals. but will attack other types of orchids . Safers will work but has to be used about every 3 days the reproductive cycle is short for them . Gin

  9. #9
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    I got mite attacks in January, they seemed like phals and dens. I used the insectcide that said kills mite, but it did not do anything. I then used a mix of vegetable oil and soap, I still could not erase them. My last try was neem oil with soap, I haven't seen one of them since then. Who knows, they might come back again this winter.

    Qing

  10. #10
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    Great Thread Gin, Thanks for the info.
    Cin

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