Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Plant viruses heavy reading

This is a discussion on Plant viruses heavy reading within the Orchid Ailments / The Compost Pile forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; A friend and I were talking today about viruses encapsulated and non encapsulated regarding birds ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    Gin's Avatar
    Gin
    Gin is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    All types
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    4,831
    Member's Country Flag

    Default Plant viruses heavy reading

    A friend and I were talking today about viruses encapsulated and non encapsulated regarding birds , I started wondering about it in plants . here is a link to a ( heavy reading ) the article about TMV is interesting . Gin

    http://www.clt.astate.edu/dgilmore/V...nt_viruses.htm

  2. #2
    Alicia is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Wow great link! I am quite shocked by this passage.
    MANAGEMENT

    Milk inactivates many viruses - use milk to wash tools/hands. "Milk does a plant body good!" Soap and water work well too!
    Removing diseased plants, killing and removing potential virus vectors (primarily weeds and insects).
    disease-resistant cultivars.
    disease or virus free seed, roots or tubers.
    cross protection (inoculation with a less-virulent strain of a virus protects the plant from a more virulent strain later when exposed to it).
    heat (some viruses are killed at temperatures that will not kill host). For example, dormant propagative organs dipped in hot water (35 C) for few minutes or hours, or by growing plants in greenhouse at 35-40 C for several days, weeks or months may inactivate virus.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  3. #3
    Gin's Avatar
    Gin
    Gin is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    All types
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    4,831
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I don't believe that at all , sounds to good to be true lol . gin

  4. #4
    Alicia is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gin
    I don't believe that at all , sounds to good to be true lol . gin
    lol Hey your link. It does seam a bit ridiculous. If true we are all practicing a nice brand of "over-kill" hygiene wise.

  5. #5
    LJA's Avatar
    LJA
    LJA is offline OrchidTalk Tech Admin
    Real Name
    Louis J. Aszod
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleya
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Clarksville, Arkansas
    Posts
    3,778
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Gin, awesome link.

    I thought this part was interesting, about how long the virus can stay dormant, and what transmits it. Sue and I had some discussions about this last year (where is Sue anyway? Anyone seen him around?):
    * difficult to inactivate, and can survive for 5 years in dead, dried tissues and many months in living plant tissues.
    * many strains, that vary in virulence from severe to mild symptoms. virus is spread from plant to plant through injuries caused by crop worker, contaminated equipment and chewing insects.
    * virus overwinters in dead plant tissues and debris, on contaminated equipment, in contaminated soil, greenhouse containers, bedding, tools, and in living hosts, including weeds like horsenettle, Solanum carolinense, and other crop plants (tomato, pepper, and eggplant).
    This part about using milk says that it seems to help reduce spreading, doesn't say that it cures infected plants:
    Management of Tobacco Mosaic Disease

    * use virus-free seed (tomato seed can by treated with acid or bleach)
    * transplant in noninfested soil
    * fumigatation with methyl bromide or heated.
    * no chewing of tobacco or smoking around seedbeds or in greenhouses.
    * to eliminate spreading of virus wash hand with soap and water or milk.
    * spraying plants with milk (whole or skim) seems to help reduce
    So, just personally, I don't think we're going overboard by taking the precautions we normally do. Growers who typically have problems with this "grow dirty;" I've been to nurseries like that--all kinds of junk everywhere, dead leaves and flowers on the benches, on the floor, in corners, plants all falling over and piled on each other, looking like hell--nasty stuff. Those places even look like insect and disease traps, so it's really no surprise when the plants that come out of them have caught something or other.... Lot of work keeping a greenhouse clean, but I think it's totally worth it.

  6. #6
    Ladybug is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    OKC
    Posts
    114

    Default

    An excellent read, Gin! I have to ask you, though....does your head ever feel like it's going to burst with all that knowledge trapped inside??? hehe
    Viruses scare me.

    Now I'm more curious than ever about why my Onc. Sweet Sugar's leaves are kinda crispy and curling under....maybe I should give it some milk?

    Maggie

  7. #7
    Gin's Avatar
    Gin
    Gin is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    All types
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    4,831
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Make mine half and half lolol. I wonder if they were referring to acids in milk that would inactivate certain types of viruses ?
    On another note I had a Mokara that had a bacterial rot , Was going to throw it out instead injected it with an antibiotic 3 times , it stopped the rot , not supposed to work on plants . Might of been just luck ?
    Bugs marinated Oncid. leaves deep fried mmmmm good . Gin

Similar Threads

  1. reading faded plant tags
    By Jmoney in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: June 3rd, 2005, 10:40 PM
  2. reading up on the spots...
    By cattlover in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: August 25th, 2004, 06:55 PM
  3. Speaking of viruses
    By LJA in forum General Orchid Culture
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: July 31st, 2004, 09:13 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.