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Bulb. echinolabium

This is a discussion on Bulb. echinolabium within the Orchids of Other Genera IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Really interesting point on the white night-attractors, Ron! I don't remember the rod vs cone ...

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  1. #11
    Piper's Avatar
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    Really interesting point on the white night-attractors, Ron!

    I don't remember the rod vs cone composition of an insect eye - I know animal eyes better. But I'm willing to bet it's mostly or completely made up of rods for nocturnal insects. Rods are activated with much lower levels of light, but can't detect differences in wavelengths (ie, their black and white). While cones detect color differences, but require more light to become active.

    That's why when it's really dark, you can't see colors, it's also why the very dim stars can only be seen out of the corner of your eye (the fovea, or central part of the retina, that captures the image you're looking directly at, is very densely packed with cones in humans, with few rods. There's a high concentration of rods in the periphery of the retina, which would "see" the dim star, but only if you don't look directly at it.

    If night pollinators require better night visition, as one would guess, they'd want rods and not cones. If so, they couldn't detect color anyway. Neat theory and it makes sense.

    They only thing I've seen on insect eyes is they're internal mechanisms to detect polorized light (linking visual input to time of day, based on the angle of the sunlight). That's very very cool, but Diane whigs out over eyeball talk, so I'll shut up now.

    McNerd

  2. #12
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    no no no - I think it would be very interesting to witness wigging out online!

  3. #13
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    Despite your shocked outrage at our yankee vulgarity, Kerry, I can see that you're clearly a troublemaker.

    The Thumb is my hostess in two weeks. I will not knowingly provoke her too much. It's hard for me, but I'm trying to practice niceness till I return safely home. You know how much she hates spiders. I don't want to find the ones in the garage relocated to my bed...

    McOnBestBehavior

  4. #14
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    Or have me point out your kilt to Miss Daffy!

    BTW eyeball talk doesn't bother me - it's those scanning electron photos that creep me out...

  5. #15
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    Oh yes I quite agree!

    I was looking up silverfish today, as we appear to have some and I was trying to work out how to get rid of them. For some reason they had highly magnified photos and ..... why is it necessary? As long as you can visibly identify the blighters, why do you need to see what their posterior looks like??????

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    Uh...I think it looks just like the front!

    McJulie

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