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Sacoila lanceolata

This is a discussion on Sacoila lanceolata within the Orchids of Other Genera IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; This species is native to many Caribbean islands, Central America, and parts of northern South ...

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  1. #1
    Mahon's Avatar
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    Default Sacoila lanceolata

    This species is native to many Caribbean islands, Central America, and parts of northern South America... I've propagate this species by seed, and they grow fast and vigorously! This plant is the result of selective breeding, and is near a scarlet red... grows best in fast draining sand.

    Sacoila lanceolata var. lanceolata


    -Pat

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    Is it deciduous, Pat?

    I had heart attacks when mine lost all its leaves last fall. But it is pushing up new growth now, albeit slowly. I still haven't figured it out.

    McJulie

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    Quote Originally Posted by Piper View Post
    Is it deciduous, Pat?

    I had heart attacks when mine lost all its leaves last fall. But it is pushing up new growth now, albeit slowly. I still haven't figured it out.
    Haha... I did send you one with leaves... yes, this species loses the leaves, and in early spring, starts new growth. It is usually easy to tell what the growth is about one week after it breaks the surface... typically, light green means leaves, and brown/red/green combination means spikes. Sacoila lanceolata var. paludicola is the evergreen variety (meaning it blooms with leaves present). Like all Spiranthoids, though, it will shed leaves after blooming (or not blooming)...

    Hopefully yours is planted deep enough! If it is planted to high, the plant WILL live, but will just take a much longer time to kick out growth. It could also stunt it...

    -Pat

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    Thanks for sharing this one, Pat!

    Cheers,
    BD

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    Cool I like that colour

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    I'll try and snap a pic tomorrow. In the meantime I'll add another layer. I hated the sand, because it kept running out the bottom of the pot when I watered. So I comprimised with layers of sphag and sand, using the sphag to more or less keep the sand in place. It's sitting a little above the medium, like I'd plant an iris, and the new growth is very slow to develop (light green), so I'll add another layer, and try to keep it moister. I'm behind on all my watering, so I'm trying to look out for those plants most sensitive.

    Does it alternate leaves versus spikes?

    McJulie

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    Quote Originally Posted by Piper View Post
    I'll try and snap a pic tomorrow. In the meantime I'll add another layer. I hated the sand, because it kept running out the bottom of the pot when I watered. So I comprimised with layers of sphag and sand, using the sphag to more or less keep the sand in place. It's sitting a little above the medium, like I'd plant an iris, and the new growth is very slow to develop (light green), so I'll add another layer, and try to keep it moister. I'm behind on all my watering, so I'm trying to look out for those plants most sensitive.

    Does it alternate leaves versus spikes?
    Another layer of sand will do good Alternate leaves vs. spikes? The leaves come in a whorl fashion, if that's what you meant. Color is usually the easiest way of telling what the growth is... since your growth came late, it most likely will be a leaf whorl.

    -Pat

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    There's no question they're leaves. I was wondering where/when the spike came from.

    If it needs another year to settle before it spikes, that wouldn't surprise me!

    McGladIDidn'tKillIt

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    It is lovely Pat when can I pick up my seedling
    Cin

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    Quote Originally Posted by Piper View Post
    There's no question they're leaves. I was wondering where/when the spike came from.

    If it needs another year to settle before it spikes, that wouldn't surprise me!

    McGladIDidn'tKillIt
    Ah, I see what you are asking... Spiranthoids will set a spike in the middle of a whorl, regardless if the leaves are present or have gone dormant. So if your plant were to bloom next year, the spike will essentially be emerging from the whorl that you are seeing now, just at a later time when the leaves have gone dormant...

    -Pat

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