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Bountiful Harvest

This is a discussion on Bountiful Harvest within the The Outback Terrace Bar forums, part of the Land Plants category; Originally Posted by angel The perception of what is stinky and what is not is ...

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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by angel View Post
    The perception of what is stinky and what is not is relative. I'm sure the orangutans would go for bananas over durian anytime. Anybody from Borneo have any opinion on this?
    Orangutans love durians, which is not surprising, but what is really surprising is that tigers love them too! This magnificent carnivore, eating fruit? Yes it's true they love the durians.. Our aborigines, the 'orang asli', and others living on the fringes of the jungle will tell you of their experiences of stumbling upon tigers eating durians while they were out gathering jungle fruits. So to avoid confrontation between man and beast they avoid collecting durians very early in the morning (the feasting hours of the tiger) and would only venture near the durian trees after 10 am. As I am only an occasional visitor to the jungle I've never seen tigers eating the durians but have been shown evidence by our guide(s) that tigers had indeed been feeding on durians recently. They point to the split skins and the neat mounds of the seeds. They say that the tiger is a very neat diner and would always pile up the seeds next to the skins.I asked them how tigers manage to open the thorny durian. It seems that they split open the durian with just one strike of the paw and never get hurt by the thorns!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by angel View Post
    Hello Pavel. Opening a durian properly takes some skill, aside from the fact that some of the older varieties have really sharp thorns (after all these years I still get cuts and scratches sometimes). I had to learn this skill when I was a boy because I ate so much durian and kept pestering my uncle to open one for me.

    One has to find the natural partitions where you carefully insert a big knife or machete and open the durian along these natural lines. With some modern hybrids, this is not so easy to find.
    It's much easier to wait for the durian to crack but by that time, some fruits may be a little too ripe, verging on being overripe. If you just hack the fruit anywhere with your knife, you'll have a very difficult time getting to the pulp and may end up with a messy fruit cut in all the wrong parts. YEW SUNG, PLEASE HELP ME TO EXPLAIN THIS BETTER!
    Sorry took such a long time to respond. I don't think I could explain any better. But here's an easy method for both novice and expert. Get a short wooden stake, diameter about an inch and length 1 ft, sharpened at one end, like the ones you would use to kill your vampires; and just drive it into the bottom end of the fruit where all the partitions of the sections converge .....and voila......even the tiger couldn't do it neater.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by catttan View Post
    Sorry took such a long time to respond. I don't think I could explain any better. But here's an easy method for both novice and expert. Get a short wooden stake, diameter about an inch and length 1 ft, sharpened at one end, like the ones you would use to kill your vampires; and just drive it into the bottom end of the fruit where all the partitions of the sections converge .....and voila......even the tiger couldn't do it neater.
    I've seen this done by the durian vendors when they open a durian for inspection by a customer before he buys it. But I never looked close enough to learn how. Being experts, they do it so quickly. And besides, I was always more interested in the contents than in how they opened the fruit. LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by catttan View Post
    Orangutans love durians, which is not surprising, but what is really surprising is that tigers love them too! This magnificent carnivore, eating fruit? Yes it's true they love the durians.. Our aborigines, the 'orang asli', and others living on the fringes of the jungle will tell you of their experiences of stumbling upon tigers eating durians while they were out gathering jungle fruits. So to avoid confrontation between man and beast they avoid collecting durians very early in the morning (the feasting hours of the tiger) and would only venture near the durian trees after 10 am. As I am only an occasional visitor to the jungle I've never seen tigers eating the durians but have been shown evidence by our guide(s) that tigers had indeed been feeding on durians recently. They point to the split skins and the neat mounds of the seeds. They say that the tiger is a very neat diner and would always pile up the seeds next to the skins.I asked them how tigers manage to open the thorny durian. It seems that they split open the durian with just one strike of the paw and never get hurt by the thorns!!
    What an interesting piece of information. And tigers too! Not even in my wildest imagination would I think of a tiger eating a durian, much less opening one. Yew Sung, I do think you are a walking encyclopedia. Perhaps not even the National Geographic knows about this.

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    Default Wani or Bachang

    Hi Yew Sung. I finally got a photo of the wani mango and you can check it out if we are referring to the same variety.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

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    Thanks Angel for the photos. I think I can now ID it - yes indeed it is a variety of the bachang , the finer variety which we refer to as the Kwini or bachang kwini. The flesh has finer texture than the bachang and is less fibrous. The fruit itself is smaller than the true bachang ; the skin is smoother and the colour more green than the true bachang. There is a controversy re the Kwini , which some believe is a true species in itself, while some believe it is hybrid of the mango and the bachang. But the smell is definitely bachang.

    Incidentally my two durian trees are giving me a bumper crop this year, about 60 fruits from 'Kop' variety (average size of each fruit 4kg), and 50 from the other unnamed variety (av size 2 1/2 kg). BTW the trees are about 30 tall.

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    interesting! thx for sharing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by catttan View Post
    Thanks Angel for the photos. I think I can now ID it - yes indeed it is a variety of the bachang , the finer variety which we refer to as the Kwini or bachang kwini. The flesh has finer texture than the bachang and is less fibrous. The fruit itself is smaller than the true bachang ; the skin is smoother and the colour more green than the true bachang. There is a controversy re the Kwini , which some believe is a true species in itself, while some believe it is hybrid of the mango and the bachang. But the smell is definitely bachang.

    Incidentally my two durian trees are giving me a bumper crop this year, about 60 fruits from 'Kop' variety (average size of each fruit 4kg), and 50 from the other unnamed variety (av size 2 1/2 kg). BTW the trees are about 30 tall.
    Wow. I'm learning so much from you Yew Sung. Now that explains it. When I bought these, I noticed they were smaller and definitely less fibrous than the wani that I am used to. So I thought these were just anomalies. hahahaha. thanks for your explanation. Now I know better. I prefer the bigger, duller green ones, or the bachang as you call it. I find this "kwini" trickier because they aren't as strong smelling as the "bachang" and sometimes I have a harder time telling if it is truly ripe already.

    Is the Kop durian similar to the Cob that we have here? This Cob is not so smelly and therefore not as tasty as some of the other varieties. whatever... a durian is a durian and for a durian lover like me, I don't really care that much. Oh how I wish I lived nearby, Yew!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by angel View Post
    t

    Is the Kop durian similar to the Cob that we have here? This Cob is not so smelly and therefore not as tasty as some of the other varieties. whatever... a durian is a durian and for a durian lover like me, I don't really care that much. Oh how I wish I lived nearby, Yew!!!!
    I don't know if they are the same. The pictures I posted last time on Page 3 of this thread shows the 'Kop' from my own tree.

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    They look similar to the Cob we have here. And then we have the Cob white and Cob green and I can't really tell the difference. The Cob also usually comes in very large sizes.

    Now that yellowish one in another picture, its equivalent here is the PUYAT variety. It is the most popular durian here because of its creaminess and sweetness. It's not my favorite though because it is quite sweet and I like those with a little bitter twist. I go for the chanee, one of the older hybrids. the chanee and the puyat also come in large sizes.

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