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Paph. Dollcevita - glamour shots

This is a discussion on Paph. Dollcevita - glamour shots within the Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; hmmm i never thought of mitochondria/choroplast genes. I don't know the effects of those genes. ...

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  1. #21
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    hmmm i never thought of mitochondria/choroplast genes. I don't know the effects of those genes. Could they make stronger mitochondria to aid in the growth of the plant/flowers??

  2. #22
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    The mitochondria is the organelle inside eukaryotic cell that provides power for the remaining cellular machinery. Since it provides power, I surmise that it would aid greatly in giving offspring more vigor and that would include flowers!
    Chloroplast is the other organelle inside plant cell that provides food for the cell through photosynthesis. Well, since it provides food, no need to go much deeper. You can tell how important that is.
    Cheers. Hoa.
    Last edited by Hoa Tony Nguyen; July 11th, 2006 at 11:54 PM.

  3. #23
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    I think I see Smartie's line of questioning. Bigger and stronger isn't the same as having more similarity to one parent. I wonder if those organelles themselves don't influence the development of certain traits. Or possibly favor the stronger maternal traits being selected.

    There's no question that in many crosses different pod parents have a tremendous impact on the offspring.

    Julie

  4. #24
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    These organelles are involved in more than just their said functions. For example, chloroplasts and related organelles like proplastids (as a group they are called plastids, all are inherited maternally) are also involved in metabolites biosynthesis, storage of essential nutrients like starch, proteins, and other essential metabolism functions. Lot of these metabolites compounds are what give the flowers their colors!

    Cheers. Hoa.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoa Tony Nguyen
    These organelles are involved in more than just their said functions. For example, chloroplasts and related organelles like proplastids (as a group they are call plastids, all are inherited maternally) are also involved in metabolites biosynthesis, storage of essential nutrients like starch, proteins, and other essential metabolism functions. Lot of these metabolites compounds are what give the flowers their colors!

    Cheers. Hoa.

    Is is possible to identify which compounds or what mixture of compounds exactly give the flowers certain colors? Has this been done? I have no idea on this one, but thought it would not hurt to ask. This thread is very interesting. Thanks for the detail.

    Cheers!
    BD

  6. #26
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    People have determined which compounds give flowers certain colors. There are two major groups of color pigments. One group of these compounds are generally called the flavonoids. They gives the flower a range of colors from yellow to red and blue. Flavonoids are divided into two groups - pigmented anthocyanins and colorless copigments. These flavonoid molecules are basically anthocyanins which are glycosylated derivatives of cyanidin (red), pelargonidin (brick red), delphinidin (blue), petunidin and malvidin. They are localized in the vacuole, a water-storage cellular organelle. The other major group of color pigments is the carotenoids - the common pigments for yellow/orange flowers. These carotenoids are found within another small cell organelle called the chromoplasts. Flower color is also influenced by co-pigmentation with other colorless flavonoids, through metal complexation, through molecular modification like glycosylation, acylation, methylation and as well as the pH of the vacuole.
    The three different pigments - chlorophyll (the green pigment that is part of photosynthesis machinery), flavonoids, and carotenoids - mixed in different proportions, give color to flowers. For example, most red phalaenopsis are the result of mixing orange carotenoids with magenta flavonoids.

    The biosynthetic pathways of these pigments are well established and studied such that these days people could engineer novel color schemes for certain horticultural plants.

    In term of determining the exact components and their ratios for certain flowers, in principle you can do it with modern analytical techniques like gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. However analyzing the cellular extract is not a simple matter since it is a complex mixture with thousand of compounds. The key here is this, YES, it is possible to determine what give a certain flower its color(s).
    So what is the interest, Bruce?

    Cheers. Hoa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoa Tony Nguyen
    People have determined which compounds give flowers certain colors. There are two major groups of color pigments. One group of these compounds are generally called the flavonoids. They gives the flower a range of colors from yellow to red and blue. These flavonoid molecules are anthocyanins which are glycosylated derivatives of cyanidin (red), pelargonidin (brick red), delphinidin (blue), petunidin and malvidin. They are localized in the vacuole, a cellular organelle. The other major group of color pigments is the carotenoids - the common pigments for yellow to orange flowers. Flower color is also influenced by co-pigmantation with other colourless flavonoids, through metal complexation, through molecular modification like glycosylation, acylation, methylation and as well as the pH of the vacuole.

    The biosynthetic pathways of these pigments are well established and studied such that these days people could engineer novel color schemes for certain horticultural plants.

    In term of determining the exact components and their ratios for certain flowers, in principle you can do it with modern analytical techniques like gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. However analyzing the cellular extract is not a simple matter since it is a complex mixture with thousand of compounds. The key here is this, YES, it is possible to determine what give a certain flower its color(s).
    So what is the interest, Bruce?

    Cheers. Hoa.
    I find this discussion fascinating, Hoa. Being such a novice at this type of science, I find myself thinking up all kinds of questions when reading these posts. It seemed to me, that if it was possible to know the exact specifics of what compound makes what color in a flower, then like with pigment or light, one would be able to create the flower color we want through manipulation of the compounds. And like you put it, easier said than done, but fascinating all the same. Thanks for the answer. Now off to look up anthocyanins and half of the other terms you mention!

    Cheers!
    BD

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    Great answer, Hoa!

    I vaguely recall a lot of this from my college days (bio major), but you're very fluent in it. Does your work involve plant biochem?

    Julie

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    Actually - He's a mad scientist! (Although I don't know what he is mad about - - in fact he is lots of fun) Dr. Sir Speedo Frankenstein?

  10. #30
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    I got the mad scientist part - I was wondering if he was a mad plant scientist?

    Julie

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