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What is the Opposite of Peloric? A Different Phal in Bloom

This is a discussion on What is the Opposite of Peloric? A Different Phal in Bloom within the Phalaenopsis, Oncidium, & Intergenerics IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; We have all been taught that an orchid's lip is a modified petal but looks ...

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  1. #1
    Dave B is offline Junior Member
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    Default What is the Opposite of Peloric? A Different Phal in Bloom

    We have all been taught that an orchid's lip is a modified petal but looks different from the other two. We also know that a peloric orchid is one whose two "normal" petals resemble the lip to some degree, but all of which differ from the three sepals. What do you call an orchid that goes off in the opposite direction, with essentially three identical petals that resemble the sepals? I came upon the pictured phalaenopsis NOID in a local nursery a few weeks ago and snapped a photo. In a certain way, it is not unattractive, but certainly unexpected. If I had a greenhouse, I might have snatched this up to see if it remains stable on future spikes, but since my windowsills are already full, I passed on it. The only other thing I can add is that all blooms on the spike were consistent in appearance, and the group of phals for sale that day did not include any that might have been a "normal" version of this clone.
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    kiwiorchids is offline Plant Nut
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    Wowza, thats pretty, reminds me of a Miltoniopsis! Perhaps there is a species that has given its unique influence to this hybrid? I dont know, but then again, it very well could be reverse pelorism?

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    Dave, that is a Phal. Elizabeth Hayden. It is so pretty, too bad I can't find any here in my country!
    Last edited by gabi_borza; July 22nd, 2011 at 01:26 PM.

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    To quote Alex Challis:
    The production of a structure that strays from its normal morphology is described as teratological, teratology being the study of plant "monsters and monstrosities.'' These mistakes in the morphology of a plant structure occur in various ways. These include fasciations, an enlargement and flattening of a plant structure, especially the inflorescence; peltation, the formation of leaf-like structures in place of perianth segments; and peloria, an abnormal regularity occurring in normally irregular flowers.

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    So Don, according to that, this would still be considered peloric?

    I had a NOID phal years back that had this mutation once.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Germinatorman View Post
    To quote Alex Challis:
    The production of a structure that strays from its normal morphology is described as teratological, teratology being the study of plant "monsters and monstrosities.'' These mistakes in the morphology of a plant structure occur in various ways. These include fasciations, an enlargement and flattening of a plant structure, especially the inflorescence; peltation, the formation of leaf-like structures in place of perianth segments; and peloria, an abnormal regularity occurring in normally irregular flowers.
    Thanks Don!

    Cheers,
    BD

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    A local nursery has one very similar to this. The flowers are huge for a phal and the mutation is gorgeous. I always leave it there as the plant never looks great and as it's happy where it is I leave it alone. But they are pretty ones for certain!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pavel View Post
    So Don, according to that, this would still be considered peloric?

    I had a NOID phal years back that had this mutation once.
    Well it is a little confusing because he starts out stating that it means the imitation of the lip by the other petals but an online dictionary states that the state of Peloria is the 'Unusual regularity in the form of a flower that is normally irregular.' Given that term, then yes I would say they are calling this peloric as well. The word peloros in Greek means monstrous - assuming it is pointing to an 'out of the ordinary' state. 'Monstrous''
    is not as horrible as we have made it out to be - it is just 'out of the ordinary'.

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    These phals are getting pretty popular. I saw Phal. Elizabeth Hayden this past year at a couple of shows...Very nice indeed. Very strange as well. I believe these originate out of a Florida breeder? or rather thats what i heard...i could be wrong

  10. #10
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    Yes it is apeloric, peloric is any deviation from normal, but in classical developmental scientific language it is a ''Homeotic'' mutant, it shows transformation of one flower organ into another. In this case it is a gene knock out. If you remember by article about ABCs of orchid flower development, there are three types of B genes say B1, B2,B3 which determine the petal identity in orchids. When only B1 genes are expressed outer tepals arise, when B1+B2 genes are expressed the inner tepal are formed, and when B1+B2+B3 are expressed the lip is formed. In this plant something messed up the B3 genes, so either they are not expressed or are expressed but not functional due to some mutation. In either case as the B3 genes are not expressed in the lip it is converted to a inner tepal like organ.
    For any one interested in more details with an illustrated explanation have a look here.
    http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchid...-pelorics.html

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