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unusual triangular shape phalaenopsis orchid

This is a discussion on unusual triangular shape phalaenopsis orchid within the Phalaenopsis, Oncidium, & Intergenerics IN BLOOM forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Originally Posted by Halloamey Great photos Maura ! The Milatassia is really beautiful and well ...

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  1. #11
    mauraec's Avatar
    mauraec is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halloamey View Post
    Great photos Maura ! The Milatassia is really beautiful and well photographed, you really have the knack for displaying orchids! The triangular Phalaenopsis is a complete homeotic mutant where the petals have completely transformed into labellum like organs.
    Once again, I'm impressed with your encyclopedic mind, Amey. I could observe how the petals had curved in towards a sort of 3-part labellum, but I didn't have a clue why - just tired of the same old phals and liked how different this was - add to that the fact that it's a NOID, and I pretty much ended any further quest for knowledge there. Now you have me hooked. What is a "homeotic mutant"? Is that like an idiopathic mutation in that particular plant's genes? Is is selfed?

    Maura

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    Your Phalaenopsis hybrid is a peloric resulted to unusual genetic mutation.

    Lovely Miltassia, I bet this one is fragrant. Does it bloom in lowlands?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilsDC View Post
    Lovely Miltassia, I bet this one is fragrant. Does it bloom in lowlands?
    Yes they do Derek. The Miltassia are a cross of the warm Brazilian Miltonia and Brassia which do very well in the lowlands. I have 4 Miltassias that bloom regularly; the danger is overwatering them resulting in root rot. I've lost a couple that way.

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    Mine has always grown in a pot, so I can't speak to growing them in lowlands conditions. I can tell you that although it has one spike at the moment, which is not fragrant, the pot is crowded with new pseudobulbs ready to spike - so if there's any fragrance, it would come with new blloms - I tend to think, given the genetic parents, that it won't have any scent, but the colors compensate anyway. - and I watch vigilantly for root rot, especially because here in the summer, my plants need watering almost every other day. In fact, I often pick up old specimen plants from a nearby nursery where they get thrown in a corner and neglected, and then resurrect them by stamping out the root rot and coaxing them to put out healthier roots. In many ways, it's more fun, and more economical, and sometimes more of a challenge to your orchid cultivation skills than buying seedling-sized plants for outrageous prices and knowing it will be at least 3 years before you see a bloom - if ever. Just my own humble opinion.

    Maura

  5. #15
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    Maura a homeotic mutant is a mutant in which one organ is converted to some other organ. It is a developmental anomaly arising due to incorrect expression of certain genes. In this case the genes that are responsible for development of the lip have been expressed in the cells of the petals giving rise to lip like petals. Usually the expression of the genes that should be expressed in lip is regulated by some other genes they stop the lip genes from expressing in petal cells. Most probably the regulatory gene is mutated in this plant, thats why the lip genes are expressed even in the petals.
    Quote Originally Posted by mauraec View Post
    What is a "homeotic mutant"?
    Maura

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halloamey View Post
    Maura a homeotic mutant is a mutant in which one organ is converted to some other organ. It is a developmental anomaly arising due to incorrect expression of certain genes. In this case the genes that are responsible for development of the lip have been expressed in the cells of the petals giving rise to lip like petals. Usually the expression of the genes that should be expressed in lip is regulated by some other genes they stop the lip genes from expressing in petal cells. Most probably the regulatory gene is mutated in this plant, thats why the lip genes are expressed even in the petals.
    Aha - between "homeotic mutant" and peloric", I had to do some research for myself. Did you know that temperature has been shown to have an effect on the expression of the mutant genes? In 2008, and perhaps since then, the AOS awarded a JC to a Dtps that showed a peloric shape described much like the one I have. I suppose if you were to have a conversation with Darwin's spirit, he might argue that genetic mutancies, particularly those that have an aesthetic appeal, are an essential part of the differentiation of species. I've looked at some flower mutants that just looked monstrous, and others that were quite attractive - and of course, the scientists have focussed all their attention on the poor old fruit fly. I would think that one good test for whether the mutant gene is an advancement or a mistake would be in the results of later bloomings, further propagation and/or sequential generations. I don't know the answer to any of these questions, and as I am most definitely NOT a scientist, my thoughts and understanding of all this could be completely wrong and off-the-wall.

    Maura

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