Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Paphiopedilum wilhelminiae

This is a discussion on Paphiopedilum wilhelminiae within the Photography Archive 1 forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Oh one more, the genus is always in upper case for example: Paphiopedilum and not ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #11
    Paphraguy is offline Former User
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,292

    Default

    Oh one more, the genus is always in upper case for example:

    Paphiopedilum and not paphiopedilum

  2. #12
    Heather is offline Banned
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,844

    Default

    thank you Pete. I will try to improve my punctuation and spelling.

  3. #13
    Máire is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Ok.... sigh... lol... I decided to order one of these. Of course I did some more research first. So here's some copy pasted excerpts (some repetitive) from various sites for anyone interested. And if you have anything to add, Peter, please do! Thanks!

    Máire


    Paph. wilhelminae

    Until fairly recently, this smaller cousin of Paph. glanduliferum has commanded high prices, but production of the plants from seed has made it a very reasonable plant to purchase. Now being generally recognized as a valid species in its own right, these plants will produce many tightly clumped growths in a very small pot, each producing 2-3 flowers per inflorescence. Bright light and warm temperatures are a must for this species, which becomes sullen if allowed to become wet and cold.

    Also occasionally referred to as Paph. glanduliferum var. wilhelminae, and Paph. gardinerii, this diminutive relative of Paph. glanduliferum has many characteristics which recommend it to the hybridizer's quest, although it has been in Paph. glanduliferum's shadow for most of this century. Extremely small plant size-- when compared to the rest of the section-- is the hallmark of this species, and most mature clones in our experience can easily grow, flower and remain in 3 ˝ inch pots. (In fact, underpotting is one of the requirements to growing this species, and its hybrids, successfully.) Flowering size plants often have leaves no longer than 5 inches, while inflorescences rarely tower over 12 inches in overall length. While rigid in its flower color of mahogany/cherry red patterning arranged on an ivory background, flowers are usually quite glossy, of good to excellent substance, and with attractive shape, although the dorsal on some clones can have a tendency to be hooded. Petals can be quite twisted along their length, although some clones are less so.

    This diminutive member of the praestans/glanduliferum complex. which some consider a separate species, is quite distinctive. The most striking feature is the white dorsal with contrasting stripes. The petals are rich glossy_oxblood, while the pouch is yellow, heavily overlaid with mahogany red. An added bonus is the deep pink staminode.

    This species is the most compact of the multiflorals and generally produces two to three blooms. It has been used extensively in breeding in recent years, and is the parent of hybrids such as Susan Booth and Oklahoma.

    Paph. wilhelminiae is in the glandifolium group allied to praestans gardinerii and kimballiana. This plant is different, however, in its diminutive size. It is only a handspan across when fully mature when it develops into compact multiple growths with stiff glossy leaves. Flowers emerge typically in the spring and are highly colored in yellow, red, and mahogany, usually three flowered on mature plants, and last for a long period of time. This plant is native to New Guinea and west Irian Jaya and the Balim River area. It is usually found growing in bright light in tall grasses with an elevation of 5000 feet. This plant is easy to grow and flower.

    This plant likes bright light, but slightly lower light than for cattleyas. Approximately 1500 foot-candles will do best.

    Since this plant grows in high elevations, summer temperatures of low to mid 80’s in the daytime and night temperatures of mid to upper 60’s are best for growth. Winter temperatures should drop 7 – 10 degrees from summer temperatures.

    This plants loves high humidity; 50% or higher is ideal.

    This plant receives lots of water during its growing period. Try to time watering according to the seasons. In the northern Hemisphere, this means fall and winter should be a time of less watering than in the spring and summer. Follow this pattern and your plants will grow and flower well. Rain water is the best to use.

    This plant typically blooms in the spring, but can bloom in the fall as well.

    Repot after the plant has finished flowering. This plant puts out new growths, but does not produces roots from the new growths for approximately a year after they mature. To divide the plant, make sure there are enough roots in each division for the plant to establish itself. After dividing, keep somewhat drier for the first month.

    Varieties: Cribb recognizes Paph. glanduliferum and Paph. glanduliferum var. wilhelminae. Koopowitz recognizes Paph. glanduliferum and Paph. wilhelminae. Braem recognizes Paph. glanduliferum, Paph. glanduliferum var. wilhelminae, Paph. glanduliferum var. gardineri, and Paph. glanduliferum var. praestans. Previously all hybrids were registered under Paph. praestans, currently they are registered under Paph. glanduliferum.

  4. #14
    Paphraguy is offline Former User
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,292

    Default

    Maire,

    Do I sense another multifloral Paph species snob in the making? LOL

    Anyway, very good reading stuff that you copied and pasted and I agree to most of it except that too much watering and too wet of the potting mix can stunt or slow the growth and even cause rot (not good at all) which can lead it to its demise very qucikly. That is what most growers have problem with growing this species. I too had trouble growing it in the beginning when I learned that it likes to be dryer than most multifloral Paphs. Now, it loves living with me LOL

    Did you get a baby seedling or a mature plant?

  5. #15
    Máire is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Oh it'll be a long while before I can claim 'snob status' I'm afraid... lol

    The plant I ordered supposedly has an 8" leafspan. So I guess for this species it should be fairly mature. Wish me luck!

    Máire

  6. #16
    Heather is offline Banned
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,844

    Default

    Best of luck!

  7. #17
    Jmoney's Avatar
    Jmoney is offline Senior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    paphs, phrags, catts, vandas
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    West Hartford, CT
    Posts
    2,978
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Excellent research, Maire!

    That dry preference gives me an idea. Since I've been using a modified s/h system with pots sitting in water trays, I think I'm going to pull the wilhelminiae, long-petalled phrag species, and brachys and stop soaking them in water (while keeping the mix the same).

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Paphiopedilum hennisianum X Paphiopedilum fowliei
    By Orchidzrule in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: April 14th, 2009, 04:22 PM
  2. Paph. wilhelminiae
    By Jmoney in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 2nd, 2008, 02:05 AM
  3. Paphiopedilum wilhelminiae
    By Mahon in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: January 7th, 2007, 01:16 PM
  4. Paph. wilhelminiae
    By Jmoney in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: January 6th, 2007, 09:47 PM
  5. my new Paphiopedilum ...!
    By diogo in forum Paphiopedilum, Phragmipedium, Cypripedium IN BLOOM
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 24th, 2006, 09:31 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.