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mycorrhizal innoculation

This is a discussion on mycorrhizal innoculation within the Semi Hydro / Lights / Greenhouses / Accessories forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; I was perusing a local home improvement store last night out of boredom and came ...

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  1. #1
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    Default mycorrhizal innoculation

    I was perusing a local home improvement store last night out of boredom and came across a small shelf FULL of goodies. They were selling lots of things that would be great for the orchid grower...rock wool, hydroton, ph adjustment chems, coconut husk products, etc. I found a bag of mycorrhizal inoculant on this same shelf. I did read about its effects on other plants and was wondering if it would have the same effects on orchids. It is supposed to increase the water and nutrient absorption of roots. I know that there are some orchids that are heavily dependent on substrate fungi, but I would most likely not be dealing with those. Have any of you used anything like this?

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    I hadn't heard of this one...I did a search and found a website that states, orchids use a different type of mycorrhizal fungi for their uptake. If you do a quick web search, you should find a good variety of information on this.

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    Thanks for the response Connie! I did a quick search this morning before I went to work and got tons of links but didn't read any. I suppose I had a case of Premature Posting! I didn't really look at the bag too in depth as I was between margaritas...the one I had at home and the one I was on my way to my fave mexi restaurant to consume. It was a monday, after all. I read a bit after I posted and realized my mistake. Guess I was too taken by the idea that my new surroundings offered more than the old!

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    Here in the Philippines, there is an organic orchid mycorrhizal supplement available locally that I have used with good results. It is a package of organic detritus that has been pre-processed and enhanced with mycorrhizal fungi. The package is emptied out in a bucket of pure water (tap water will do but it is advised that it is left to stand overnight or more so that any chlorine gas present will dissipate). The solution is made to stand for about an hour or so where the solid matter settles down and leaves the water colored brown. The liquid is then filtered to remove solid particles into a spray tank and the solution is sprayed onto the plants. You can use it as is or add other items such as fertz, etc into the solution although it is advised NOT to mix fungicides as this may kill the active mycorrhiza. It doubles as a weak organic fertilizer at the same time. Whatever sediment is left in the bucket can be reused used over and over for as long as one can get (brownish) color when you mix water. When water comes clear after so many repeated uses one can use the solid material left-over as top dressing for regular houseplants.

    In my (limited) use of the product, I've noticed that my orchids have turned a lush dark green and growth is enhanced with plenty of healthy, plump aerial roots. The leaves are noticeably bigger for each new growth.

    Upon reading the back label, I noted that the manufacturers are located in the same area where the University of the Philippines College of Agriculture is located so I guess the people making the product must be from there too.

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    Bump!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Why start a new thread when existing ones can get bumped!? Unfortunately the search engine results for this can be so overwhelmingly prolific a ton of info becomes a chore to edit through.

    Has this fungus or any other been a successful part of anyones delivery of orchid general care and cultivation. Or is it just a useful tool for seed germination/ propagation. I would certainly like to implement measures that aid an orchid root to absorb an increase in water and nutrition as deficiences can be severe especvially overwatering root rot victims that rely solely on new growth and successful new root mass to have a chance of survival.

    The necrotic root tip dieback has many possible reasons and becomes somewhat a mystery when a process of elimination nears an unsuccessful conclusion. Could this or other fungus aid or rectify this frustrating irritating occurence. I see calcium deficiency could be a culprit and plants are just not taking it in. Have ruled out salts/overdose, toxicity,ph, humidity, bad water temp light!!!!!!!! I kinda hope this could be the reason for those fresh new roots with apple green tips that turn black and whole root dies. many orchids suffer it, dends , catts and lots of others. Have ceased using deodarant aerosols nearby.

    please somebody shine me a light!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!as my need to add variety/ species to the collection is causing an orchid collection to slowly look like a game of 'wheres the orchid amongst the other tropicals'. I swear ive missed something, like a secret no one has dared to share. The only thing worse than a root rot plant is being denied any chance of ressurection because any new roots will die at 2"-3" long!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bizarre! wheres those science tech heads Amey and Geoff (Halloamey and Dorsetman)??????????????????????????Time for a copy/paste/PM.

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    Matt, mycorrhiza innoculations are possible and have been shown to work in many papers while germinating orchids. It will surely benefit the health of the orchid and make it grow more in the 'natural' way. But the problem would be development of atleast genus specific if not species specific innoculation cultures. The orchid-mycorrhiza association is a very very specific one. Some orchids will form such associations with a wide variety of mycorrhiza types and some orchid species restrict to just a unique species, so a 'general' innoculant may not work, but one could definitely make at least genus specific innoculants. Actually you can make it on your own if you grow any natural orchid species that was collected from the wild not so long ago.

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    On the other hand, I use Mycorhizza which is based on Carbs and so far my Oncidium, Coleogyne, Paphs and Phrags respond well to it. It would do no harm in general. Also, I am not a genius when it comes to core-orchid issues but certain orchid species do keep their relationship with the fungi throughout their lives and some give up right after germination.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurj View Post
    Also, I am not a genius when it comes to core-orchid issues but certain orchid species do keep their relationship with the fungi throughout their lives and some give up right after germination.
    Gurjeet, all wild orchids always have symbiotic relationships with fungi through-out their lives, what changes is the nature of relationship and partners for eg. Orchid seedlings are dependent on the fungal partner for the carbon (sugars) for germination, once they start photosynthesis, they may no longer need the carbon (some depend on the fungi all their lives for the carbon), but they do not abandon or end the relationship, they just do not get their carbon from them, they still need these fungi for obtaining phosphates and other nutrients since these fungi decompose organic nutrients from leaf litter or even parasitic on other trees for these substances. Some times the symbiont for germination is different from the one during the adult stages, but mycorrhiza are an essential aspect for the growth and survival of all orchids.

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    Thanks a lot!

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    Thank you for the response Amey, i was hoping for the thread to get more attention and hope Jason subscribed to view his thread. Within a community it doesnt take long to work out who would have the better advantage in answering varying topics with the best possible and helpful advice, this (thread) definetly being one for a science phd/doctorate orientated orchid nut.

    I suppose im 'in for a penny in for a pound' at this point, and will have a go since the subject has not been completely de bunked and dismissed. Im running out of probable causes for root die back. I wont be able to risk being caught foraging amongst the Cyp colonies/ Ophyrs and swamp meadow Dacts, the fines for tampering and poaching are huge. It dawned on me with the re precautionary use of systemi fungicides, surely it cant be a to good an idea just because of systemic action, cant rule out the possibilibility of contact with other ingredients?

    Would the controlled application on mounts, of home grown white button mushroom spawn have any significance? I ask this due to the mycelium under soil level same wwith shitake, chesnut and oyster mushroom small scale farming.? Ofcourse im probably barking up the wrong tree! Have just applied 'blood/fish and bone to all the mounts as well.

    and thanks Gury, it certainly cant hurt, worth a pot shot.

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