Shop Orchid Care OrchidTalk Orchid Forum Weather Station Links Nursery

Welcome to OrchidTalk Orchid Forums


The Friendliest Orchid Community on the Internet!


  •  » Learn to Repot your Orchids
  •  » Learn Orchid Care Tips and Secrets
  •  » Find the perfect Orchid for your Growing Environment
  •  » Chat with Orchid Growing Professionals

OrchidTalk - "Bringing People Together to Grow Orchids Better!"


Let us help you grow your Orchids better; Join our community today.


YES! I want to register an account for free right now!


Register or Login now to remove this advertisement.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
Like Tree6Likes

Camera question

This is a discussion on Camera question within the Technical Photography Discussion forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Okay, so I'm considering sending my old Canon camera to retirement. I've been looking at ...

Click here to increase the font size Click here to reduce the font size
  1. #1
    orchid lady's Avatar
    orchid lady is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Marissa
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cymbidiums
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    516
    Member's Country Flag

    Default Camera question

    Okay, so I'm considering sending my old Canon camera to retirement. I've been looking at different cameras but I just get confuse each time. My brain tells me, the more expensive the better, which is probably not always the case. To make the story short, I know nothing when it comes to camera. This one I'm currently using was a work camera that was just provided to me. I don't want to spend over $300, I want something that is easy to use (not complicated)will take good, clear photos, especially close ups. I also want to know the difference between 4x and 10x optical zoom and what's a mega pixel. I'm sure you can already tell I'm not a technical person....lol

    Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated......pleaseeeeeeeeeeeee

  2. #2
    stacey8989's Avatar
    stacey8989 is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Stacey
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    196
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I'm no expert with cameras. My opinion is the more expensive, the more fancy functions you'll never figure out how to use.

    I think most point & shoot cameras have a close-up macro function. I use Sony since I can remove the memory stick and plug it into my laptop. I usually use a Sony Cyber-Shot. Model: DSC-W90 which I'm sure is discontinued by now.

    I don't think I have any friends who are disappointed with their Canon PowerShots either.

    You should have plenty of decent cameras to choose from in the <$300 price range. I'll leave the specific model recommendations to the experts.

  3. #3
    Ron-NY is offline rothaholic
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Saratoga Co. New York
    Posts
    6,922

    Default

    a pixel stands for picture element. The higher the pixel the clearer/more accurate the image.

    I would go with a digital-Single Lens Reflex camera (d-SLR). Point and shoots are fine but a camera that you can adjust depth of field and manual focus are major pluses. That said...I have no recommendations...I am still using a point and shoot, 8.0 megapixel

  4. #4
    orchidlady's Avatar
    orchidlady is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Susan
    My Grow Area
    Under Lights
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Phal and Paph species
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    904

    Default

    I am not camera-technical literate either, but just got myself a new DSLR. I have used a point and shoot for years with ok, but not great results for close up macro shots. I have found that to get really good quality close up pictures of flowers you truly need to get an SLR type camera where you can change lenses and settings to get the picture you want. Many point and shoot cameras (such as mine) have a macro setting, but is really not extremely good quality. The optical zoom you are talking about is for telephoto use to bring farther away items visually closer to you. This is not used for macro (extreme close up) shots. A 4x optical zoom would be 4 times closer and 10x would be 10 times closer. However, this would not be figured into close up shots of flowers. It would be used more for landscape or wildlife photos. My new camera was just received yesterday and has all the confusing buttons and will take some time to learn. I think I will take a basic class from a local community college to get the most benefit from it. My goal is to take really good macro shots of my orchids and other plants. Anyone else feel free to correct any of my explanations if I am misunderstanding.

    Susan

  5. #5
    bench72's Avatar
    bench72 is offline Moderator
    Real Name
    Tim
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Paphiopedilums
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    5,480
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    I've just ordered an Olympus E-420 D-SLR which is basically the cheapest entry level DSLR. I'm yet to learn about the DSLR's so I'll leave that to the experts to advise.

    However, I've been using a Fuji A203 point and shoot for years and I've found it to be very useful for most of my picture taking. It has only 2.0 megapixel so, it's really outdated and many will have more clarity in it's ability to pixellate a photo. But it does have a macro setting and that's how I set the camera when taking flower photos.

    All my photos online are taken by this cheap little camera (check out all the Paphiopedilum threads I've started.. there's usually pictures there).

    Now, I've found that I have a few more plants of the 'botanical' variety (read: tiny flowers) blooming and I am unable to take good enough photos of them, hence the move towards a DSLR with macro lens. Will let you know if it's worth it or not in a couple of days when I receive it

  6. #6
    the dragonn's Avatar
    the dragonn is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Steve
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    just about all of them
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Liverpool, England
    Posts
    531
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    An SLR camera does give you alot more scope when it comes to taking pics but can turn out to be costly when buying different lenses. That said, I wouldn't be without mine now.
    If you were happy with your old Canon and found it easy to use I'd stick with them. The powershots and EOS ranges are excellent.

  7. #7
    orchid lady's Avatar
    orchid lady is offline Senior Member
    Real Name
    Marissa
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cymbidiums
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    516
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Thanks everybody for the input. I wanted the DSLR but it's way over my budget. I ended up getting a 10megapixels Nikon CoolPix L100 with 15x Optical Zoom and it was within my budget of $300.

  8. #8
    sushiboy's Avatar
    sushiboy is offline Junior Member
    Real Name
    nc
    My Grow Area
    On a Windowsill.
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    singapore
    Posts
    27
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Hi Susan,

    I am a Nikon user and the D700 is really a good camera but you will have to pay more (am still saving. sigh...). it can take your normal AF lenses as well as the newer digital ones.

    To take close ups, you will normally need a true macro lens. this is a lens that gives you 1:1 reproduction ratio. cheaper alternatives include reverse mounting the lens (with an reverse mounting adaptor) or to use a close up 'filter' which can be easily bought at any camera shop. you will also need a tripod to help you reduce them movements when you are doing close ups. when you are doing close ups, there are times when it is very difficult to achieve a right focus because your depth of field is reduced. to aid in focusing, some will use a macro slider or a focusing rail to help in achieving focus.

    To decrease depth of field further and to increase your magnification, you can also use an extension tube. this is a hollow tube mounted between your lens and the camera. it brings out your point of focus by increasing the backgroud blur, decreasing the depth of field.
    it also reduces the camera subject distance.

    Once you experiment, you will get the hang of it with time. really a pleasure to shoot close ups!!! hope this posting helps and happy shooting!

  9. #9
    Shannara's Avatar
    Shannara is offline =(o.O)=
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Encyclias
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    638

    Default

    I ended up getting a 10megapixels Nikon CoolPix L100 with 15x Optical Zoom and it was within my budget of $300
    Can't go wrong with a Nikon...I've got a D300 but it took over a year before I was able to get this sucker!

    Congrats!

    Shann~

  10. #10
    Matim is offline Junior Member
    My Grow Area
    Windowsill
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Masdevallia
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Limburg, The Netherlands
    Posts
    10
    Member's Country Flag

    Default

    Maybe a little bit off topic, but in a photograph forum I once read: "The best camera is the camera you have in your pocket!"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What camera do you use?
    By Shannara in forum Technical Photography Discussion
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: July 10th, 2012, 09:49 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
OrchidTalk --An Orchid Growers Discussion Forum brought to you by River Valley Orchidworks. A World Community where orchid beginners and experts talk about orchids and share tips on their care, cultivation, and propagation.