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DSLR's - Digital Single Lens Reflex Cameras

This is a discussion on DSLR's - Digital Single Lens Reflex Cameras within the Technical Photography Discussion forums, part of the Orchid Photography category; Originally Posted by Sushiboy Hi Susan, I am a Nikon user and the D700 is ...

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  1. #1
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    Default DSLR's - Digital Single Lens Reflex Cameras

    Quote Originally Posted by Sushiboy
    Hi Susan,

    I am a Nikon user and the D700 is really a good camera but you will have to pay more (am still saving. sigh...). it can take your normal AF lenses as well as the newer digital ones.

    To take close ups, you will normally need a true macro lens. this is a lens that gives you 1:1 reproduction ratio. cheaper alternatives include reverse mounting the lens (with an reverse mounting adaptor) or to use a close up 'filter' which can be easily bought at any camera shop. you will also need a tripod to help you reduce them movements when you are doing close ups. when you are doing close ups, there are times when it is very difficult to achieve a right focus because your depth of field is reduced. to aid in focusing, some will use a macro slider or a focusing rail to help in achieving focus.

    To decrease depth of field further and to increase your magnification, you can also use an extension tube. this is a hollow tube mounted between your lens and the camera. it brings out your point of focus by increasing the backgroud blur, decreasing the depth of field.
    it also reduces the camera subject distance.

    Once you experiment, you will get the hang of it with time. really a pleasure to shoot close ups!!! hope this posting helps and happy shooting!

    I thought it appropriate to start a new thread. Thank you so much for the information Sushiboy. It is very helpful. I just purchased a Canon Rebel XSI which is one of the entry level below $1000 DSLR's. It seems to have decent reviews. It came with the standard 18-55mm lens and I have purchased a previously owned Canon EF-S 60mm F/2.8 Macro USM Lens. The macro is coming with a circular polarizing and a UV filter. I will get a tripod. I have seen other goodies that seem to go with macro photography such as ring flashes and lens hoods. Are these kind of things must haves? I would be interested in finding out what others use for their macro shots .

    Susan

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    Default

    This thread talks about different lenses some of of use. Might be helpful.

    Lets Talk Lenses

    Congrats on the new camera.

    Shann~

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    Congrats on that new camera. A friend of mine has the Xsi and seems very happy with it.

    I've been wanting to switch to Canon (from Minolta), but can't afford it at the moment.


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    Great news about the new camera. Congratulations!

    Cheers,
    BD

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    Lizgeo is offline Senior Member
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    Congrats on your new camera. I can't help you out on the lenses because I have used Nikon for years, I stick to the brand so we can use all the lenses.

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    I, for one, would like to own a ring flash but it is not a necessity in macro photography and it probably won't be used much if it were to be on my list of equipment...very likely ending up as a white elephant!! A ring flash helps in illuminating the object and increasing your shutter speed, thus reducing motion blur. It also reduces the shadow from a direct flash. What my friends and i do is to use a reflector. If you are also exploring illuminating subjects with backlighting, then i don't think you will need the ring flash. It all depends very much on what kind of photos and effects you want. In my opinion, the most important equipment you need, other then your camera and lens, is a tripod and a focusing rail. It helps a lot!!

    Another thing. You might need one of those flexible clips (or you could fashion something using twistees, tying wires....) that will help to attach/tie your subject to something sturdy nearby like your tripod or a nearby stem (like when you are trying to shoot a flower and there is a light breeze). This helps stabilise your subject and prevent motion blur. Cheers and happy shooting!!!!

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    Hi Susan and welcome to the wonderful world of professional photography... The XSi and the 60mm macro lens are great gear. I hope I see your lovely photographs soon...
    I agree with nc... Macro lights are for nature photographers who capture fast moving insects... As for us, we can attach the camera to the tripod and set the timer... The result should be a properly exposed image...
    IMHO having good gear is only 1/3 of photography... the other 2/3 is photography love and post processing!...
    Good luck...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sushiboy View Post
    I, for one, would like to own a ring flash but it is not a necessity in macro photography and it probably won't be used much if it were to be on my list of equipment...very likely ending up as a white elephant!! A ring flash helps in illuminating the object and increasing your shutter speed, thus reducing motion blur. It also reduces the shadow from a direct flash. What my friends and i do is to use a reflector. If you are also exploring illuminating subjects with backlighting, then i don't think you will need the ring flash. It all depends very much on what kind of photos and effects you want. In my opinion, the most important equipment you need, other then your camera and lens, is a tripod and a focusing rail. It helps a lot!!!
    I use a ring flash all the time. What it is great for is cataloging your orchid flowers with a standard color and exposure so the comparison is easy .. ie if you have different clones or seedlings you can easily see the differences. Also I set the shutter speed to 1/250 to eliminate outside light, and set the f stop to f20 for depth of field. All this is to make a very flat photo ie no shadows, but very very sharp, no blur and I can hand hold it in a greenhouse with no tripod to get in the way. The shutter speed stops all motion that way.

    Just some thoughts on the plus side of the ring flash. I've owned several and the current one I have Canon even lets you adjust the bulbs on the sides to create a slight shadow if you are so inclined.

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