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  • 1 Post By Orchids&Roses

Interesting, but unknown

This is a discussion on Interesting, but unknown within the General Orchid Culture forums, part of the Orchid Culture category; This Orchid is in my neighborhood, and I walk by it at least once a ...

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  1. #1
    Orchids&Roses is offline Junior Member
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    Default Interesting, but unknown

    This Orchid is in my neighborhood, and I walk by it at least once a day. It has been in the ground for at least 25+ years, sharing places with a palm tree and bamboo. I don't know what it is. I think it could be some kind of "schomburgkia". Any ideas from folks out there?

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  2. #2
    orchidlady's Avatar
    orchidlady is offline Senior Member
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    To me it looks like a reed stem Epidendrum that my mother has in Califorina growing outside. Closer photos of the flowers and growth pattern might help.

    Susan

  3. #3
    Orchids&Roses is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you "orchidlady" for your response. You are correct and I was way off. It is a "Epidendrum quitensium elongatum", I purchased a 4" pot of this orchid at a local orchid nursery just the other day and it matches perfectly to the mystery orchid I started the thread with. Now my new question is----how do you tell the difference between a Schomburgkia with very long reeded purple blooms and a Epidendrum with very long reeded purple blooms? I'm so new at this, just have a few orchid books and the internet for aid, don't belong to a "club" yet.

  4. #4
    Keysguy is offline Senior Member
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    Just in general (typically but not in every case)........both the plants and the flowers are totally different.

    Reed stem Epi's have fairly short thin leaves on very long semi-woody main stems (no psedobulb) and those often will develop multiple keikei's. The flowers are held on long "whispy" inflorecenses and are a small flower.

    Schoms have pseudobulbs like laelia/cattleya (and I think they are now technically laelia's) with very heavy think leaves. Flowers are held on a long semi-woody infloresence and open in a bunch at the top just like epi but this stem is much bigger around and flowers are significantly larger and will look like a laelia flower.

    Like I said.....a gross overgeneralization but that should help you have a general sense.

  5. #5
    Dorsetman's Avatar
    Dorsetman is offline Senior Member
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    And Schombo's have tall, thick bulbs - sometimes hollow and providing a home for ants in their native country, although a quite different species of ant which is a pest where I live has not found them in my greenhouse ( crossed fingers..) . I like Schombo's - I once stumbled on a little orchid show when I had a holiday touring Venezuela , and all the entries in the show where Schombos. Some of them had flower stems 6 feet tall and more, and great heads of flowers , arranged quite symmetrically to form a ball of flowers 2 feet across. Absolutely spectacular.
    So I had to try my hand at a few - of course my temperatures and sunshine hours are much lower than in South America, at least in Venezuela which is quite close to the equator, although this was at quite an altitude I think. Anyway , they will flower for me, as pale shadows of what you see in the wild, but often with a succession of flowers opening few at a time over several months.
    There are also inter-generic hyhbrids - Schombo-cattleyas , and I have two different ones in advanced bud now, which I hope to show here in the next month or so.

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