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Thread: Introducing myself with a first help request...

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
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    Female
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    UK
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    Post Introducing myself with a first help request...

    Hi all, I am new in this forum and also into the orchid world!
    I have always loved them but never managed to grow them despite numerous attempts!!! Finally this year I managed to make my two phalaenopsis to grow new floral spikes and It was extreamly exciting!!!
    Now I have a question regarding the mini phalaenopsis... It produced one nice spike that is now growing but I noticed it has another bud which is not clear to me if it is a spike or not (see picture). Considering the position... it might be a spike but It is like this for more than a month now... and nothing happens... not growing at all. Is it normal? What can I do for it?
    Thanks in advance for any help.
    Happy to be part of this community!
    Best,
    Dany

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  2. #2
    Real Name
    Ray Barkalow
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Oak Island NC
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    First of all, Dany, welcome to the group.

    In phalaenopsis, the flower spikes and roots tend to emanate from pretty similar locations, so you have to be patient and check the shape of the nub. If it is smooth and rounded, it is likely a root tip. If it looks like a little mitten, it's likely an inflorescence.

    As far as encouraging the growth of either one, you simply need to provide good culture.

    It's hard to say for sure, but it appears you're growing it awfully dry. Phals prefer even moisture, but like all orchids, require lots of air to the root system. You've probably read that "orchids must dry out between waterings", but that is only true if they're in the wrong potting medium for your growing conditions. You might take a moment to READ THIS.

  3. #3
    Real Name
    Bruce Brown
    My Grow Area
    Greenhouse
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    Cattleyas & Slippers
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Male
    Location
    Arkansas
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    35,058
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    Default

    Welcome to the group, Dany.

    cheers,
    BD

  4. #4
    My Grow Area
    Outside 24/7
    Favorite Orchid(s)
    All of them
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    Female
    Location
    Port Orange, Florida
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    5,111
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    Default

    Welcome Dany!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Thanks for the help!
    I know It looks quite dry, but problem is that the pot is not well ventilated (I made some holes myself but they are too small) so I tend not to water too much because even if outside is dry inside the pot it is quite moist (I see condense on the walls).
    I should repot them in proper pots with new medium but I am afraid that it will stop the blooming so I am postponing it...
    Thanks also for the reading link!

  6. #6
    Real Name
    Ray Barkalow
    My Grow Area
    Porch/Patio.
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Oak Island NC
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    Due to the perennial spread of bad information, folks have come to equate “moisture” with “root rot”, and it’s untrue.

    Unlike terrestrial plants that do most of their respiratory gas exchange through their leaves, epiphytic orchids have evolved to do much of that through their roots. So let’s think about that in relation to potting media and watering:

    When we water, most pours right through and some is immediately absorbed by the roots and the potting medium. There is a third fraction that is pertinent - that which is held in-between the particles by surface tension.

    If the void spaces in the medium are small, either due to the use of too fine of a medium or because it has compacted with age and decomposition, water can completely fill them, which cuts off air flow to the roots, suffocating them. Then they die and rot. If the void spaces are large, however, water only fills around the contact areas, and open pathways for air movement and gas exchange are still present.

    So... to me “overwatering” is a misnomer. It should be “under-airing”. I really believe the myth that “orchids must dry out between waterings” is based upon a misinterpretation of observation. If you have a poor medium that stops airflow to the roots when watered, letting it dry opens up the structure again, letting the roots “breathe”. Bad medium, not bad water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
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    Female
    Location
    UK
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    Default

    That makes perfect sense... thanks for the clear explenation!
    Dany

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